Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsYugoslavia Revolts
IN THE NEWS

Yugoslavia Revolts

NEWS
October 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
Bosnian Serb students pelted U.S. peacekeepers with eggs and stoned Muslim-owned businesses Thursday to press their demand that Bosnian Muslims leave this ethnically tense city. Two people were injured and 10 arrested, Police Chief Dusko Kokanovic said. He urged authorities to declare a state of emergency in Brcko, where the students demonstrated for a third straight day.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 18, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbia's revenge of the nerds began with a call from a former paramilitary commander with a love of the Internet and an urgent need for recruits. Dragan Vasiljkovic had one crucial assignment left on Oct. 6, as the uprising against Slobodan Milosevic entered its last, critical phase: Seize the customs department from one of Milosevic's most powerful cronies, Mihalj Kertes. The silver-haired Vasiljkovic, 45, hadn't seen battle in years and hadn't slept for two days.
NEWS
October 14, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ratko Tisanovic's eyes move unconsciously to his calloused hands as he ponders how his role in the brutal siege of Sarajevo changed his life. "Before the war, you couldn't find what we had anywhere else in Europe," recalls the former restaurateur who now earns barely enough from a sawmill job just outside Sarajevo to pay for the cigarettes that help take his mind off hunger and sorrow. "But we lost all of this because we went to war for a state of our own," he concedes.
NEWS
October 11, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are celebrations in the streets of Belgrade and high hopes in Western capitals now that Slobodan Milosevic's destructive reign has ended. But in the tiny republic of Montenegro there is only fear that the world expects a reinvigorated Yugoslavia to rise up along with the democratic masses. After years of abuse by Serbia, the dominant partner in the Yugoslav federation, Montenegrins have trained their sights on independence.
NEWS
October 11, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica struggled to solidify power amid political bickering and the threat of a backlash by rogue police units, allies of ousted leader Slobodan Milosevic broke off talks Tuesday on handing over control of Serbia's government.
NEWS
October 10, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The political battle against allies of deposed leader Slobodan Milosevic almost erupted into a real shootout outside the Serbian parliament Monday as bodyguards for an ultranationalist leader responded to a hail of rocks from protesters by firing handguns into the air.
NEWS
October 10, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Policemen used to take Velimir Ilic aside after his rants against the dictatorship at rallies in this Serbian town. But instead of the warning he expected, they whispered him secret encouragement to keep up the good work. At first, the mayor was suspicious.
NEWS
October 10, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Milo Djukanovic of Montenegro suffered unspecified injuries and was hospitalized Monday night after his limousine crashed on a mountain road despite a security cordon meant to protect a figure whose defiance of Slobodan Milosevic was crucial in toppling the Yugoslav dictator. News of the crash initially triggered alarm in top government offices here because it was assumed to have been an attempt on the pro-Western president's life.
NEWS
October 8, 2000 | Reuters
Two British policemen who spent two months in Yugoslavia's military jail on suspicion of terrorism flew out of Belgrade Saturday after the country's new authorities freed them. The Yugoslav army arrested Adrian Prangnell and John Yore along with Canadians Shaun Going and Liam Hall in the area between Kosovo and Montenegro in early August. "It's been a bit of an adventure, we're just glad it's all over and we can get back to our families," Yore told reporters at Belgrade airport.
NEWS
October 8, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just when the world had about concluded that economic sanctions are close to useless against entrenched dictators, the sudden downfall of Slobodan Milosevic in Yugoslavia has sent a different message. Sometimes the strategy seems to work. No analyst is claiming that the economic and political isolation imposed on Yugoslavia by the United States and its allies is the only reason Milosevic was forced from power.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|