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Yugoslavia Revolts

NEWS
March 5, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three Macedonian soldiers were killed as fighting with ethnic Albanian guerrillas raged near the Kosovo border Sunday, and the violence triggered a shift in U.S. policy to support for tougher Macedonian military action against the insurgents. "We understand the need and obligation of Macedonia to respond to this kind of threat," U.S. Ambassador to Macedonia M. Michael Einik told reporters in Skopje, the capital.
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NEWS
March 4, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago this month, NATO launched its 78-day bombing campaign against Yugoslavia to protect the majority ethnic Albanians in the Kosovo region. Now, the alliance is trying to cool down an upsurge of fighting just outside Kosovo's borders. But ethnic Albanian grievances--both historical and recent--ensure that the task won't be easy.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague convicted three former Bosnian Serb commanders of rape and torture Thursday in the first international trial to focus exclusively on wartime sexual violence. The three received sentences ranging from 12 to 28 years for enslaving Muslim women and girls in "rape camps" during the Bosnian war, after Serbian forces overran the southeastern town of Foca in April 1992.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A Yugoslav soldier has died of injuries suffered in fighting with ethnic Albanian guerrillas in southern Serbia, the army said. The soldier was wounded in an attack Friday, the army said. He is believed to be the first soldier to die in clashes with the guerrillas in the volatile border area of Serbia proper adjoining U.N.-ruled Kosovo province. The violence has also claimed the lives of police in Serbia, the main Yugoslav republic.
NEWS
January 11, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Biljana Plavsic, once Washington's leading Serbian ally in postwar Bosnia-Herzegovina, will stand trial on charges of genocide and other war crimes, the U.N. tribunal in The Hague confirmed Wednesday. Plavsic, the first woman to be indicted by the war crimes tribunal and the most senior Bosnian Serb leader to stand trial there, will plead not guilty today, her lawyer, Krstan Simic, said in The Hague.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | From Reuters
Britain rejected a French proposal for a joint parachute assault in 1995 to rescue the doomed Bosnia-Herzegovina town of Srebrenica, where as many as 8,000 residents were massacred by Serbs, a parliamentary commission was told Thursday. "The idea was for 600 paratroopers, flown directly from France, to jump and capture an airfield [inside Serbian lines near Srebrenica] and hold it while reinforcements were landed to break the siege," witness Gilles Herzog told the panel.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using loaded words reminiscent of the Slobodan Milosevic era, Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica threatened Tuesday to "cleanse" the border zone between Serbia proper and Kosovo of "terrorists." Ethnic Albanian fighters from separatist Kosovo, still technically a province of Serbia, have stepped up attacks on Serbian police during the past several weeks. They also targeted U.S.
NEWS
December 17, 2000 | From Reuters
A senior member of a Kosovo Albanian party was wounded in a drive-by shooting, the latest in a series of attacks on officials of the moderate group, U.N. police said Saturday. The man, a member of the Democratic League of Kosovo, or LDK, led by veteran ethnic Albanian politician Ibrahim Rugova, was shot Friday afternoon, said U.N. police spokesman Dmitry Kaportsev.
NEWS
December 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
Thousands of angry Serbs stood vigil at blockaded roads near the Kosovo border Thursday, demanding a meeting with Yugoslavia's president and the ouster of militant ethnic Albanians from the region. Independence-minded ethnic Albanians took control nearly a month ago of strategic points in the 3-mile-wide demilitarized zone that separates Kosovo from the rest of Serbia. Pressure is rising on President Vojislav Kostunica to use force against the rebels.
NEWS
November 28, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The postwar wall of distrust between Yugoslavia and the United States crumbled a bit more Monday as Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica shook hands and spoke briefly here with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. The surprise meeting was the highest-level contact between the two governments in the nearly 18 months since the U.S. led a 78-day bombing campaign against Yugoslavia to end a vicious civil war in the Serbian province of Kosovo.
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