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Yugoslavia Revolts

NEWS
April 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
NATO-led peacekeepers have detained 12 suspected ethnic Albanian guerrillas who crossed into Kosovo from Albania, a United Nations police spokesman said. The detainees were suspected of belonging to a guerrilla group in neighboring Macedonia, U.N. spokesman Andreas Graf said in Kosovo. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization deployed peacekeepers to Kosovo--a province of Serbia, the dominant Yugoslav republic--after a 1999 air war to halt an "ethnic cleansing" campaign against ethnic Albanians.
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NEWS
March 31, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Special police wearing black masks and firing automatic weapons stormed deposed Yugoslav leader Slobodan Milosevic's mansion early today, hours after the government claimed that he was already under arrest. The operation came at 1:30 a.m., shortly after a defiant Milosevic appeared on television, smiling and waving to a small crowd of supporters at the gates of his compound. Police arrived in three vehicles, fired weapons and threw stun grenades to clear federal troops guarding the mansion.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
With NATO's blessing, elite Yugoslav army troops moved today into a southern Serbia buffer zone overrun by ethnic Albanian guerrillas, as part of a plan to cap cross-border violence that threatens to expand into a new Balkan war. In columns of armored personnel carriers, hundreds of members of the 63rd Parachute Brigade fanned out in the southernmost tip of the zone around Kosovo that runs, at one end, into the Macedonian border.
NEWS
March 11, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talks on a proposed cease-fire between Yugoslav forces and ethnic Albanian guerrillas in southern Serbia's Presevo Valley broke off with no apparent progress Saturday. The difficulties delayed today's plans for Yugoslav troops to begin entering part of a buffer zone between Kosovo and Serbia proper adjacent to the Macedonian border, Yugoslav authorities said.
NEWS
March 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A former army general whose investigation for alleged war crimes spurred nationalist protests was formally charged in the 1991 killings of civilians in the central Croatian city of Gospic, the state prosecutor said. Maj. Gen. Mirko Norac and four other former soldiers were indicted on charges that they ordered and took part in the killings of at least 24 civilians, prosecutor Radovan Ortinsky said. It is believed that all the victims were Serbs.
NEWS
March 5, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three Macedonian soldiers were killed as fighting with ethnic Albanian guerrillas raged near the Kosovo border Sunday, and the violence triggered a shift in U.S. policy to support for tougher Macedonian military action against the insurgents. "We understand the need and obligation of Macedonia to respond to this kind of threat," U.S. Ambassador to Macedonia M. Michael Einik told reporters in Skopje, the capital.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago this month, NATO launched its 78-day bombing campaign against Yugoslavia to protect the majority ethnic Albanians in the Kosovo region. Now, the alliance is trying to cool down an upsurge of fighting just outside Kosovo's borders. But ethnic Albanian grievances--both historical and recent--ensure that the task won't be easy.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague convicted three former Bosnian Serb commanders of rape and torture Thursday in the first international trial to focus exclusively on wartime sexual violence. The three received sentences ranging from 12 to 28 years for enslaving Muslim women and girls in "rape camps" during the Bosnian war, after Serbian forces overran the southeastern town of Foca in April 1992.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A Yugoslav soldier has died of injuries suffered in fighting with ethnic Albanian guerrillas in southern Serbia, the army said. The soldier was wounded in an attack Friday, the army said. He is believed to be the first soldier to die in clashes with the guerrillas in the volatile border area of Serbia proper adjoining U.N.-ruled Kosovo province. The violence has also claimed the lives of police in Serbia, the main Yugoslav republic.
NEWS
January 11, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Biljana Plavsic, once Washington's leading Serbian ally in postwar Bosnia-Herzegovina, will stand trial on charges of genocide and other war crimes, the U.N. tribunal in The Hague confirmed Wednesday. Plavsic, the first woman to be indicted by the war crimes tribunal and the most senior Bosnian Serb leader to stand trial there, will plead not guilty today, her lawyer, Krstan Simic, said in The Hague.
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