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Yugoslavia Revolts

NEWS
December 17, 2000 | From Reuters
A senior member of a Kosovo Albanian party was wounded in a drive-by shooting, the latest in a series of attacks on officials of the moderate group, U.N. police said Saturday. The man, a member of the Democratic League of Kosovo, or LDK, led by veteran ethnic Albanian politician Ibrahim Rugova, was shot Friday afternoon, said U.N. police spokesman Dmitry Kaportsev.
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NEWS
December 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
Thousands of angry Serbs stood vigil at blockaded roads near the Kosovo border Thursday, demanding a meeting with Yugoslavia's president and the ouster of militant ethnic Albanians from the region. Independence-minded ethnic Albanians took control nearly a month ago of strategic points in the 3-mile-wide demilitarized zone that separates Kosovo from the rest of Serbia. Pressure is rising on President Vojislav Kostunica to use force against the rebels.
NEWS
November 28, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The postwar wall of distrust between Yugoslavia and the United States crumbled a bit more Monday as Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica shook hands and spoke briefly here with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. The surprise meeting was the highest-level contact between the two governments in the nearly 18 months since the U.S. led a 78-day bombing campaign against Yugoslavia to end a vicious civil war in the Serbian province of Kosovo.
NEWS
November 27, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Yugoslav army sent tanks and reinforcements near the NATO-patrolled boundary with Kosovo, a day before Yugoslavia's deadline for the Western alliance to crack down on ethnic Albanian militants whose attacks have inflamed the region. Yugoslav authorities have threatened to launch counterattacks after the deadline passes this afternoon. Many residents in Kosovo, which is a province of Serbia, Yugoslavia's main republic, want full independence.
NEWS
November 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Yugoslavia's new president huddled Thursday with his security commanders on the Kosovo border, where ethnic Albanian rebels have launched a major offensive, triggering Western concerns of another Balkan flash point. Kosovo is a province of Serbia, Yugoslavia's main republic, but it has been under international control since last year, and many residents want full independence.
NEWS
November 11, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Washington's effort to neutralize Bosnian Serb nationalists faces a serious threat today as the party founded by indicted war crimes suspect Radovan Karadzic goes into elections well ahead in opinion polls. The Serbian Democratic Party, or SDS, which Karadzic created a decade ago to promote Bosnian Serb nationalism, insists it has nothing more to do with Karadzic. Five years after the end of the Bosnian war, he is still in hiding to escape arrest on charges of genocide and other war crimes.
NEWS
November 2, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a key gesture toward reconciliation between Serbs and Kosovo's ethnic Albanians, new Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica on Wednesday freed imprisoned activist Flora Brovina, who quickly returned to Kosovo to rejoin her family and receive a hero's welcome.
NEWS
October 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
Bosnian Serb students pelted U.S. peacekeepers with eggs and stoned Muslim-owned businesses Thursday to press their demand that Bosnian Muslims leave this ethnically tense city. Two people were injured and 10 arrested, Police Chief Dusko Kokanovic said. He urged authorities to declare a state of emergency in Brcko, where the students demonstrated for a third straight day.
NEWS
October 18, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbia's revenge of the nerds began with a call from a former paramilitary commander with a love of the Internet and an urgent need for recruits. Dragan Vasiljkovic had one crucial assignment left on Oct. 6, as the uprising against Slobodan Milosevic entered its last, critical phase: Seize the customs department from one of Milosevic's most powerful cronies, Mihalj Kertes. The silver-haired Vasiljkovic, 45, hadn't seen battle in years and hadn't slept for two days.
NEWS
October 14, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ratko Tisanovic's eyes move unconsciously to his calloused hands as he ponders how his role in the brutal siege of Sarajevo changed his life. "Before the war, you couldn't find what we had anywhere else in Europe," recalls the former restaurateur who now earns barely enough from a sawmill job just outside Sarajevo to pay for the cigarettes that help take his mind off hunger and sorrow. "But we lost all of this because we went to war for a state of our own," he concedes.
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