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OPINION
December 27, 2012 | By Wade Graham
A study released last week by the Bureau of Reclamation confirms what everyone already knows: We are sucking more water out of the Colorado River Basin than nature is putting in. Like draining a savings account, water users in the seven basin states (Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada and California) and Mexico have been drawing down Lake Powell and Lake Mead by about a million more acre-feet of water than rain and snowmelt provide each year. According to the bureau, users' plans for yet more pipelines combined with the effects of global warming, will push the annual deficit as high as 8 million acre-feet by 2060, a cataclysmic shortfall.
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NATIONAL
May 28, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
A massive ice jam on the Yukon River sent a flood of water into Galena, Alaska, inundating most of the town and forcing the evacuation of nearly the entire population. “I think the majority of the folks have been evacuated from the village,” Dave Streubel, National Weather Service hydrologist, told the Los Angeles Times on Tuesday afternoon as floodwaters approached the last lifeline to the isolated village -- the airport. Water was backed up 40 to 50 miles behind the large ice jam at a sharp bend in the river known as Bishop Point, 15 miles downriver from Galena, and most of the town was flooded, Streubel said.
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SPORTS
August 12, 1985 | EARL GUSTKEY
The birth of a salmon is a triumph of spirit, a celebration of life. For fishermen working a salmon run, there is a sense of participation in one of nature's timeless dramas. Hatching out of tiny eggs in shallow-water gravels of tributaries to a river, little salmon survive at first by absorbing energy from their attached yolk sacs, then by eating plankton and other tiny foods. After about a year, they move downstream. When only four to six inches long, they swim into the open ocean.
OPINION
December 27, 2012 | By Wade Graham
A study released last week by the Bureau of Reclamation confirms what everyone already knows: We are sucking more water out of the Colorado River Basin than nature is putting in. Like draining a savings account, water users in the seven basin states (Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada and California) and Mexico have been drawing down Lake Powell and Lake Mead by about a million more acre-feet of water than rain and snowmelt provide each year. According to the bureau, users' plans for yet more pipelines combined with the effects of global warming, will push the annual deficit as high as 8 million acre-feet by 2060, a cataclysmic shortfall.
NEWS
March 29, 1987 | DEAN FOSDICK, Associated Press
In the chill and darkness of Alaska winter, Indians along the Yukon River gather to keep alive a fiddling tradition that owes as much to mail order catalogues as to fur traders. Hudson Bay fur trappers introduced violin music to the Athapascans of interior Alaska in the 1820s. With the music came dancing: light-hearted reels, jigs, square dances and waltzes with roots in Scotland, French Canada and the Orkney Islands. But it was Sears, Roebuck & Co.
NATIONAL
May 28, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
A massive ice jam on the Yukon River sent a flood of water into Galena, Alaska, inundating most of the town and forcing the evacuation of nearly the entire population. “I think the majority of the folks have been evacuated from the village,” Dave Streubel, National Weather Service hydrologist, told the Los Angeles Times on Tuesday afternoon as floodwaters approached the last lifeline to the isolated village -- the airport. Water was backed up 40 to 50 miles behind the large ice jam at a sharp bend in the river known as Bishop Point, 15 miles downriver from Galena, and most of the town was flooded, Streubel said.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2008 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
With a sickening thud, another hefty and handsome salmon lands in the waste barrel, headed for the dogs. "See, it's all of the biggest, best-looking fish," said Pat Moore, waving a stogie at the pile of discards. "It breaks my heart. My dogs cannot eat all that. The maggots will get them first." More Alaskan salmon caught here end up in the dog pot these days, their orange-pink flesh fouled by disease that scientists have correlated with warmer water in the Yukon River. The sorting of winners and losers at Moore's riverbank fish camp illustrates what scientists have been predicting will accompany global warming: Cold-temperature barriers are giving way, allowing parasites, bacteria and other disease-spreading organisms to move toward higher latitudes.
MAGAZINE
June 15, 2003 | Drex Heikes, Drex Heikes is executive editor of the Los Angeles Times Magazine.
Dad made a break for it. He rigged the Chrysler Caravan with oxygen cylinders, pocketed his heart and diabetes medicines and set out in mid-March, alone, age 77, on a 3,251-mile journey from his home in Anchorage to visit his mother in Minnesota, which is why my brother and I watched the NCAA basketball championship at a bar on the Yukon River. My mother had urged him to fly to Minnesota, not drive. The highway to the continental United States is grueling.
TRAVEL
August 17, 1997
The articles in the July 27 Travel Section were the greatest in a long time. San Juan Islands and the Yukon River ("Paddling Into the Past") were a pure pleasure to read. It was a trip through the past in the present, well written! VIRGINIA JOHNSON Hesperia
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Forest fires have burned up to 270,000 acres and spread fast because of dry weather, an Alaska state forestry official said. More than 1,000 firefighters were battling 44 of the blazes. The flames have come close to native villages, lakeside recreational areas and within 200 yards of some cabins in the Yukon River Valley but so far have burned no buildings. The fires have left trans-Alaska oil pipeline operations unaffected.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2008 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
With a sickening thud, another hefty and handsome salmon lands in the waste barrel, headed for the dogs. "See, it's all of the biggest, best-looking fish," said Pat Moore, waving a stogie at the pile of discards. "It breaks my heart. My dogs cannot eat all that. The maggots will get them first." More Alaskan salmon caught here end up in the dog pot these days, their orange-pink flesh fouled by disease that scientists have correlated with warmer water in the Yukon River. The sorting of winners and losers at Moore's riverbank fish camp illustrates what scientists have been predicting will accompany global warming: Cold-temperature barriers are giving way, allowing parasites, bacteria and other disease-spreading organisms to move toward higher latitudes.
MAGAZINE
June 15, 2003 | Drex Heikes, Drex Heikes is executive editor of the Los Angeles Times Magazine.
Dad made a break for it. He rigged the Chrysler Caravan with oxygen cylinders, pocketed his heart and diabetes medicines and set out in mid-March, alone, age 77, on a 3,251-mile journey from his home in Anchorage to visit his mother in Minnesota, which is why my brother and I watched the NCAA basketball championship at a bar on the Yukon River. My mother had urged him to fly to Minnesota, not drive. The highway to the continental United States is grueling.
NEWS
March 29, 1987 | DEAN FOSDICK, Associated Press
In the chill and darkness of Alaska winter, Indians along the Yukon River gather to keep alive a fiddling tradition that owes as much to mail order catalogues as to fur traders. Hudson Bay fur trappers introduced violin music to the Athapascans of interior Alaska in the 1820s. With the music came dancing: light-hearted reels, jigs, square dances and waltzes with roots in Scotland, French Canada and the Orkney Islands. But it was Sears, Roebuck & Co.
SPORTS
August 12, 1985 | EARL GUSTKEY
The birth of a salmon is a triumph of spirit, a celebration of life. For fishermen working a salmon run, there is a sense of participation in one of nature's timeless dramas. Hatching out of tiny eggs in shallow-water gravels of tributaries to a river, little salmon survive at first by absorbing energy from their attached yolk sacs, then by eating plankton and other tiny foods. After about a year, they move downstream. When only four to six inches long, they swim into the open ocean.
SPORTS
March 6, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Joe Runyan and Doug Swingley pressed on toward the Yukon River, still without having taken their mandatory 24-hour layovers. The two sled dog racers left Cripple, Alaska, the race's halfway point, at 11:50 a.m. and 12:09 p.m. A pack of mushers that had taken the required rest was closing in on Cripple. Martin Buser moved into third place.
SPORTS
March 10, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Defending champion Susan Butcher took the lead in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog race as mushers began moving up the frozen Yukon River in Alaska. Butcher spent only 22 minutes in the village of Anvik before heading upriver to Grayling, 18 miles away, early Saturday. She was followed one minute later by Lavon Barve and DeeDee Jonrowe, both top-five finishers for the past two years.
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