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Yukuo Takenaka

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BUSINESS
May 10, 1989
Peat Marwick Main & Co. announced that Susumu Mitarai has been appointed partner in charge of Japanese practice in Southern California, succeeding Yukuo Takenaka. Mitarai will move from the accounting firm's New York office. Takenaka has resigned as a Peat Marwick partner and has formed his own investment banking firm, Takenaka & Co., but will continue as a Peat Marwick senior adviser.
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BUSINESS
July 20, 1990 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Home Savings of America tower in downtown Los Angeles has been sold to a partnership of U.S. investment banker Yukuo Takenaka and Japan's Kawasaki Enterprises, it was announced Thursday. Although the purchase price was not disclosed, sources close to the deal said the amount was $80 million to $100 million for the 24-story, 260,000-square-foot building, at 7th and Figueroa streets. H. F. Ahmanson & Co.
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BUSINESS
July 20, 1990 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Home Savings of America tower in downtown Los Angeles has been sold to a partnership of U.S. investment banker Yukuo Takenaka and Japan's Kawasaki Enterprises, it was announced Thursday. Although the purchase price was not disclosed, sources close to the deal said the amount was $80 million to $100 million for the 24-story, 260,000-square-foot building, at 7th and Figueroa streets. H. F. Ahmanson & Co.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1989
Peat Marwick Main & Co. announced that Susumu Mitarai has been appointed partner in charge of Japanese practice in Southern California, succeeding Yukuo Takenaka. Mitarai will move from the accounting firm's New York office. Takenaka has resigned as a Peat Marwick partner and has formed his own investment banking firm, Takenaka & Co., but will continue as a Peat Marwick senior adviser.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Standing on a promenade overlooking the Los Angeles skyline, Yukuo Takenaka surveyed the skyscrapers and pointed out some of the buildings owned by Japanese investors. Arco Tower. Chase Plaza. AT&T Tower. Manulife Plaza. "The Japanese don't own all of downtown," he said, grinning before he added, "Yet." Takenaka should know. As a partner in the accounting firm of Peat Marwick Main and head of its Japan Project, he has built an unrivaled roster of 1,200 Japanese clients in the United States.
REAL ESTATE
August 7, 1988
The second annual Pacific Basin Development Conference in Maui, Hawaii, on Aug. 17-20 will be attended by 100 American real estate developers and leaders of Japanese real estate investment firms in the United States and Japan to explore potential joint ventures. Featured speakers will be Taizo Watanabe, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary, at the Japanese Embassy in Washington, and Jim Deane, prominent California home builder.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1992 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anticipating that the U.S. government will eventually lift a ban on commercial activity with Vietnam, United Airlines is trying to lay the groundwork to establish flight service to that Southeast Asian nation. United Chairman Stephen M. Wolf met last week met with top aviation officials in Hanoi to convey his company's interest in establishing commercial service to Vietnam after a lifting of the U.S. government embargo on dealings with that country.
MAGAZINE
November 5, 1989 | RUSS PARSONS , Parsons is food editor of the Los Angeles Times Syndicate.
Yukuo Takenaka's first brush with the differences between Japanese and American social customs came in a physical-education class in Salt Lake City when he was 15 years old. "We had a dancing class," he says, shaking his head. "That really shook me. You have to remember, in Japan in those days, we didn't even talk to girls and we certainly didn't hold hands. I had never danced in my life. In fact, I had never touched a woman's hand before. And in the United States, girls grow up very fast.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1990 | MIKE KRENSAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's largest airline and two Japanese developers will build a $250-million hotel, condominium, office and retail complex that would be the largest single development in the Little Tokyo area of downtown Los Angeles, they announced Thursday. All Nippon Airways, through its real estate and hotel subsidiaries, and two Japanese developers agreed to build the 1.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1992 | JUBE SHIVER JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
After helping shape the skyline of Los Angeles, New York and other cities during a massive 1980s building spree, the president of one of the most powerful and successful Japanese-owned real estate development firms in the United States has resigned. Okitami Komada, who for the past five years was president and chief executive of Mitsui Fudosan U.S.A. Inc., a unit of Tokyo-based real estate concern Mitsui Fudosan Co., left Friday to form his own real estate consulting firm, Komada International.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Standing on a promenade overlooking the Los Angeles skyline, Yukuo Takenaka surveyed the skyscrapers and pointed out some of the buildings owned by Japanese investors. Arco Tower. Chase Plaza. AT&T Tower. Manulife Plaza. "The Japanese don't own all of downtown," he said, grinning before he added, "Yet." Takenaka should know. As a partner in the accounting firm of Peat Marwick Main and head of its Japan Project, he has built an unrivaled roster of 1,200 Japanese clients in the United States.
REAL ESTATE
July 17, 1988
Direct capital investment in the United States by the Japanese and the potential for joint-venture relationships by Japanese and American real estate investors, developers and builders will be the focus of the second annual Pacific Basin Development Conference at the Wailea Resort on Maui, Hawaii, Aug. 17-20.
REAL ESTATE
September 4, 1988 | DICK TURPIN
The Japanese certainly have the money to lend and spend on American real estate and a growing desire to joint venture with their U.S. counterparts. All that American would-be deal makers have to do is have lots of heart and patience. That was the crux of four days of discussions among 100 delegates attending the second annual Pacific Basin Development Conference, sponsored by the Los Angeles Times, in Wailea, Hawaii.
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