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April 14, 2002 | Associated Press
When triple jumper Yuliana Perez fled Cuba after being kicked off the national track and field team, she chose to go to Tucson only because she was born there. Just 18, she spoke no English and knew no one. Her mother had been shot to death when she was 3. The father she didn't know was in a Georgia prison. Back in Arizona and exhausted from a day's work as a waitress, she climbed aboard the wrong city bus, and fell asleep.
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February 14, 2003 | Valerie Gutierrez, Times Staff Writer
For triple jump champion Yuliana Perez, the Los Angeles Invitational on Saturday will not only be a test of how far she can go but will mark an anniversary of how far she has come. From Tucson, where she was born, to her family's native Cuba and back again. Her parents, seeking freedom and a better life, left Cuba in a rickety old boat while Perez's mother was pregnant with her. Years later, Perez fought to return to the U.S. after circumstances took her back to Cuba.
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SPORTS
February 14, 2003 | Valerie Gutierrez, Times Staff Writer
For triple jump champion Yuliana Perez, the Los Angeles Invitational on Saturday will not only be a test of how far she can go but will mark an anniversary of how far she has come. From Tucson, where she was born, to her family's native Cuba and back again. Her parents, seeking freedom and a better life, left Cuba in a rickety old boat while Perez's mother was pregnant with her. Years later, Perez fought to return to the U.S. after circumstances took her back to Cuba.
SPORTS
April 14, 2002 | Associated Press
When triple jumper Yuliana Perez fled Cuba after being kicked off the national track and field team, she chose to go to Tucson only because she was born there. Just 18, she spoke no English and knew no one. Her mother had been shot to death when she was 3. The father she didn't know was in a Georgia prison. Back in Arizona and exhausted from a day's work as a waitress, she climbed aboard the wrong city bus, and fell asleep.
SPORTS
July 12, 2003 | John Ortega
Five title-winners from the USA Track & Field championships last month and three reigning NCAA champions are scheduled to compete today and Sunday in the inaugural USATF Mid-Summer Games at Mt. San Antonio College. The meet, which starts at 3 p.m. each day, is designed to give national-class athletes not competing on the European circuit a chance to test themselves before representing the U.S. in the Pan American Games at Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, on Aug.
SPORTS
July 13, 2003 | John Ortega
James Davis was eliminated in the first round of the men's 400 meters in the USA Track & Field championships at Stanford three weeks ago, but he defeated a high-quality field in the Mid-Summer Games at Mt. San Antonio College on Saturday night. Davis, who is hoping to earn a spot on the United States' 1,600-meter relay team that will compete in the Pan American Games on Aug. 6-10 at Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, ran a season best of 45.
SPORTS
June 23, 2002 | From Associated Press
Maurice Greene silenced his top challenger in the men's 100 meters--just barely. Marion Jones still has no American rival in the women's 100. Greene edged Tim Montgomery at the U.S. Championships on Saturday night to win his third national title in the 100. Twenty minutes earlier, Jones raced to her fourth U.S. title at that distance. Greene's time of 9.88 seconds would have been the best in the world this year, but the wind was just over the allowable limit. Montgomery crossed in 9.
SPORTS
February 16, 2003 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Jon Drummond's legs ached Saturday. His legs always ache after he runs on the pitted track at the Sports Arena, yet he competes in the Los Angeles Invitational indoor track meet every year in front of crowds smaller than those he sat among when he was growing up. "I run here because it's home," said Drummond, who won a gold medal as the leadoff runner on the U.S. 400-meter relay team at the Sydney Olympics. "It's not really a quote, unquote money meet. We wish we could get more sponsors.
SPORTS
January 26, 2003 | HELENE ELLIOTT
As Canadian Olympian Hayley Wickenheiser continues to make history playing for a second-division men's professional hockey team in Finland, Cammi Granato is cheering enthusiastically. "It was good to see her get a point," said Granato, a pioneer of the women's game in the United States and leader of the U.S. teams that won a gold medal at the 1998 Nagano Games and silver last year at Salt Lake City. "She looks comfortable.
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