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Yvon Chouinard

OPINION
June 15, 2002
Poets speak of mountains as eternal. The ancients feared them as the abodes of dragons or demons. Nineteenth century climbers went to conquer them. Modern climbers toil to cleanse them of the trash left by their predecessors. And mountains are far too often the stage for rebellion and warfare. In fact, high mountains are fragile and subject to environmental damage, swarmed by tourism and chipped away by indiscriminate development.
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NEWS
June 24, 1994 | GERI COOK, Geri Cook can be heard from 9 to 10 a.m. Saturdays on KIEV 870-AM
For those dedicated to sports and the environment, the name Patagonia represents a beacon of light and a lifestyle. Since 1957, when owner Yvon Chouinard began making pitons, or spikes, for mountain climbers, Patagonia has broadened its scope to manufacturing spirited and functional clothes for the outdoors. The merchandise is top-quality, the prices a touch high, but devotees of this label can turn to Ventura, where Patagonia's only California outlet store offers healthy price breaks.
NEWS
August 4, 1998 | KATHRYN BOLD
The event: Ninth Waterman's Ball, the Surf Industry Manufacturers Assn.'s big night out, at the Ritz-Carlton in Dana Point. The association staged the gala Friday to honor surf legends and raise money for ocean preservation. * Surf & Turf: More than 900 party-goers, many of them surf legends and local surf industry executives, gathered outside the hotel on a bluff overlooking the ocean in time for a spectacular sunset. The location pleased those who had attended past balls at landlocked hotels.
NEWS
June 16, 1994 | WENDY MILLER, Wendy Miller is editor of Ventura County Life
I'm no hero, no daredevil. Never been described as "hellbent for leather." I get my kicks vicariously, willingly letting others thumb their nose at death. I admire the courage of anyone who withdraws money at an ATM after dark. As I sit in front of the computer writing this column--as perilous an undertaking as I care to have today--I'm beginning to hyperventilate over the subject of this week's centerpiece. Rock climbing.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1998 | LEO SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It could be a writing utensil or a mode of transportation, or maybe some camping equipment or a bicycle accessory. It could be virtually anything, really, as long as it enhances the outdoor experience with a quality, sustainable design that shows concern for the environment. Those are the characteristics that seven judges will be looking for in the "Q=E International Design Competition" sponsored by the Patagonia outdoor clothing and accessory manufacturing company of Ventura.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento A dozen companies committed to maximizing social good while turning a profit have filed papers with the state to become California's first "benefit corporations. " Chief executives, led by Yvon Chouinard, founder of Patagonia Inc., a maker and seller of outdoor apparel and equipment, marched into the secretary of state's office in Sacramento shortly after it opened Tuesday morning. It was the first business day they could register under a recently approved state law that gives companies a way to legally structure their businesses to consider social and environmental efforts as part of their missions.
OPINION
December 27, 1992 | DONELLA H. MEADOWS, Donella H. Meadows is an adjunct professor of environmental studies at Dartmouth College. and
There's an astonishing page in the latest Patagonia sports clothing catalogue, written by Yvon Chouinard, president of Patagonia. It tells why he's decided that his company should stop growing. "Last fall," he says, "we underwent an environmental audit to investigate the impact of the clothing we make . . . . To no one's surprise, the news is bad. Everything we make pollutes. Polyester, because it's made from petroleum, is an obvious villain, but cotton and wool are not any better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2012 | Valerie J. Nelson
Michael J. Ybarra, a former Times reporter who had recently chronicled his extreme-sports adventures for the Wall Street Journal, was killed in a mountain-climbing fall over the weekend on the edge of Yosemite National Park. He was 45. A veteran mountaineer, he had set out alone to cross the craggy Sawtooth Ridge in the Eastern Sierra and summited the 12,280-foot Matterhorn Peak before he fell about 200 feet to his death, said his sister, Suzanne Ybarra. His family reported him missing Sunday, and a rescue crew spotted his body Tuesday in a rugged area difficult to reach on foot, according to Kari Cobb, a park ranger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1997 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's more "Developers Don't Like Me" than "Roger & Me" and less "Hoop Dreams" than "Urban Nightmares," but followers of Councilwoman Elois Zeanah have produced a 25-minute documentary film urging citizens to vote against her recall Nov. 4.
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