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Yvon Chouinard

MAGAZINE
March 12, 1995
Peter Carlin's "Pure Profit" (Feb. 5) demonstrates the pitfalls of the modern business world. Entrepreneurs with the best of intentions get caught in a cycle of growth that's irresistible but destructive. Lured by profit and the chance to do more good, a small company with ideals tends to grow into a large bureaucracy in which the visionary founders gradually become removed from their product, thus losing control over both company and product. The large bureaucracy has become a necessary evil.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1995 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The historic sandstone boulders at Chatsworth's Stoney Point Park are "one of the cradles of American rock-climbing," according to the sport's enthusiasts. But to a Warner Bros. crew filming Steven Seagal's latest action opus--"Under Siege 2: Dark Territory"--they're mainly an outdoor set.
OPINION
June 15, 2002
Poets speak of mountains as eternal. The ancients feared them as the abodes of dragons or demons. Nineteenth century climbers went to conquer them. Modern climbers toil to cleanse them of the trash left by their predecessors. And mountains are far too often the stage for rebellion and warfare. In fact, high mountains are fragile and subject to environmental damage, swarmed by tourism and chipped away by indiscriminate development.
NEWS
June 24, 1994 | GERI COOK, Geri Cook can be heard from 9 to 10 a.m. Saturdays on KIEV 870-AM
For those dedicated to sports and the environment, the name Patagonia represents a beacon of light and a lifestyle. Since 1957, when owner Yvon Chouinard began making pitons, or spikes, for mountain climbers, Patagonia has broadened its scope to manufacturing spirited and functional clothes for the outdoors. The merchandise is top-quality, the prices a touch high, but devotees of this label can turn to Ventura, where Patagonia's only California outlet store offers healthy price breaks.
NEWS
August 4, 1998 | KATHRYN BOLD
The event: Ninth Waterman's Ball, the Surf Industry Manufacturers Assn.'s big night out, at the Ritz-Carlton in Dana Point. The association staged the gala Friday to honor surf legends and raise money for ocean preservation. * Surf & Turf: More than 900 party-goers, many of them surf legends and local surf industry executives, gathered outside the hotel on a bluff overlooking the ocean in time for a spectacular sunset. The location pleased those who had attended past balls at landlocked hotels.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1998 | LEO SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It could be a writing utensil or a mode of transportation, or maybe some camping equipment or a bicycle accessory. It could be virtually anything, really, as long as it enhances the outdoor experience with a quality, sustainable design that shows concern for the environment. Those are the characteristics that seven judges will be looking for in the "Q=E International Design Competition" sponsored by the Patagonia outdoor clothing and accessory manufacturing company of Ventura.
MAGAZINE
February 18, 2001
Why did you publish Janet Reitman's article "Soul Men" (Jan. 21)? To publicize that visitors can use illegal drugs and camp wherever they want in Yosemite? To glorify people who steal sleeping bags by pretending to vomit? Was it a veiled high school membership drive for "underground Yosemite"? Or does Reitman want us to expel all climbers from our national parks because of these few outlaws? I expected to read an article about rock climbing. What was the point of this? Karen Casey Upland The piece on the freeloading, stoned rock climbers in Yosemite was disgusting.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
While Yvon Chouinard may be best known for founding Patagonia, the Ventura-based distributor of outdoor clothing, the seeds of his $70-million empire were in the functional climbing gear he first fashioned in the early 1960s in a metalworking shed in his parents' back yard. Chouinard Equipment Ltd. posted only $6 million in sales last year. But it was the industry leader, buoyed by the reputations of its high-performance gear and its high-profile founder, who has spent months at a time climbing treacherous ice in Antarctica or scaling Himalayan peaks without taking oxygen.
OPINION
December 27, 1992 | DONELLA H. MEADOWS, Donella H. Meadows is an adjunct professor of environmental studies at Dartmouth College. and
There's an astonishing page in the latest Patagonia sports clothing catalogue, written by Yvon Chouinard, president of Patagonia. It tells why he's decided that his company should stop growing. "Last fall," he says, "we underwent an environmental audit to investigate the impact of the clothing we make . . . . To no one's surprise, the news is bad. Everything we make pollutes. Polyester, because it's made from petroleum, is an obvious villain, but cotton and wool are not any better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2003 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Yosemite's storied Camp 4, a birthplace of rock climbing's modern age and an enduring mecca for the adventurous, has been honored with a spot on the National Register of Historic Places, park officials announced Thursday. Little more than a shaggy collection of campsites encircling an antiquated cinderblock restroom, Camp 4 is for the climbing fraternity a spot as rich with history as Gettysburg.
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