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May 2, 2004 | Sasha Anawalt, Special to The Times
Fresh winds. New people. New movement. New choreography." Those were the opening lines of a review in March 1962 by Jill Johnston, who covered dance and art for New York's Village Voice from 1959 to 1968. Johnston was extremely personal, often describing the process of how she saw something and allowing herself, in the words of current Voice dance critic Deborah Jowitt, to be "devoured by art."
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2009 | Chris Pasles
Making dances about dance is a familiar postmodernist occupation. But what about making a dance about a dance and its first audience? And blending in a contemporary audience to boot? Think wheels within wheels, layers upon layers. The boggling idea comes off as a delight only when someone like avant-garde choreographer and filmmaker Yvonne Rainer tackles the project. Rainer's "RoS Indexical," which received its West Coast premiere Thursday at REDCAT in downtown Los Angeles, revisits the 1913 Paris premiere of the Vaslav Nijinsky-Igor Stravinsky ballet "The Rite of Spring," which sparked the most famous riot in dance history.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2009 | Susan Josephs
Back in the early 1970s, Yvonne Rainer was in the midst of a transition from postmodern dance maker to experimental film auteur. She still had all kinds of ideas for new dances, but she would jokingly send them to her friend, the choreographer Trisha Brown, instead of realizing them herself. "Movement was not coming out of my body the way it once had," she recalls. "At that time, I was feeling the limitations of choreography, whereas film opened up a whole new set of possibilities."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2009 | Susan Josephs
Back in the early 1970s, Yvonne Rainer was in the midst of a transition from postmodern dance maker to experimental film auteur. She still had all kinds of ideas for new dances, but she would jokingly send them to her friend, the choreographer Trisha Brown, instead of realizing them herself. "Movement was not coming out of my body the way it once had," she recalls. "At that time, I was feeling the limitations of choreography, whereas film opened up a whole new set of possibilities."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2006 | Lewis Segal
RASTA THOMAS Ballet star Not many dancers have performed leading roles with the Kirov Ballet, Dance Theatre of Harlem and National Ballet of Cuba, plus Twyla Tharp's "Movin' Out" on Broadway and a featured solo at the Academy Awards. But Rasta Thomas has earned credits and medals galore without, somehow, establishing himself in the ballet public's mind as indelibly as other dancers who've spent their careers in one place or company.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2009 | Chris Pasles
Making dances about dance is a familiar postmodernist occupation. But what about making a dance about a dance and its first audience? And blending in a contemporary audience to boot? Think wheels within wheels, layers upon layers. The boggling idea comes off as a delight only when someone like avant-garde choreographer and filmmaker Yvonne Rainer tackles the project. Rainer's "RoS Indexical," which received its West Coast premiere Thursday at REDCAT in downtown Los Angeles, revisits the 1913 Paris premiere of the Vaslav Nijinsky-Igor Stravinsky ballet "The Rite of Spring," which sparked the most famous riot in dance history.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1993 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Honorary Doctorates: Los Angeles Master Chorale Music Director Paul Salamunovich will receive an honorary doctorate from Loyola Marymount University at the university's 1993 commencement today. Other honorary doctorates to be awarded in the coming week: to Helen Gorman Kushnick, former executive producer of the "Tonight Show With Jay Leno," from William Woods College in Fulton, Mo.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2005
Stage bound: "The First Wives Club," the 1996 movie about spurned wives seeking revenge, has joined the lineup of films being developed into Broadway musicals. Producers Paul Lambert and Jonas Neilson plan to match the material with new songs -- and perhaps some of the old hits as well -- by the veteran Motown songwriters Eddie Holland, Lamont Dozier and Brian Holland.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
'The Man Who Envied Women' U.S.A., 1987, 125 minutes, 8 p.m. Warner Building, AFI, 2021 N. Western Ave., Hollywood For people who are into deconstruction in a big way. Yvonne Rainer's video portrait of divided male/female consciousness--an academic structuralist and his embittered ex-wife--is a compendium of fascinatingly apt contemporary jargon and political attitudes. But Rainer's mannered style and Jackie Raynal's awkward performance sabotage the text.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2009 | Sherry Stern
It was already big news in L.A.'s dance world that REDCAT would be serving up the West Coast premiere of works by choreographer Yvonne Rainer. Now comes word that when Rainer's "RoS Indexical" and "Spiraling Down" are performed at the downtown venue Thursday through Sunday, the esteemed 74-year-old will be on stage as well. Rainer is stepping in for Pat Catterson, who is unable to make the performance (and at 63 was the oldest of the four dancers on the bill). Rainer was a major figure in dance in the 1970s but took a 25-year hiatus to concentrate on filmmaking.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2006 | Lewis Segal
RASTA THOMAS Ballet star Not many dancers have performed leading roles with the Kirov Ballet, Dance Theatre of Harlem and National Ballet of Cuba, plus Twyla Tharp's "Movin' Out" on Broadway and a featured solo at the Academy Awards. But Rasta Thomas has earned credits and medals galore without, somehow, establishing himself in the ballet public's mind as indelibly as other dancers who've spent their careers in one place or company.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2004 | Sasha Anawalt, Special to The Times
Fresh winds. New people. New movement. New choreography." Those were the opening lines of a review in March 1962 by Jill Johnston, who covered dance and art for New York's Village Voice from 1959 to 1968. Johnston was extremely personal, often describing the process of how she saw something and allowing herself, in the words of current Voice dance critic Deborah Jowitt, to be "devoured by art."
NEWS
March 3, 2005 | Lewis Segal
Question: Why do dancers wear such revealing costumes? * Segal: Ever since the Renaissance, the most idealized depictions of the human body in Western painting, sculpture and dance have been inspired by the art of ancient Greece. And that art gloried in the naked truth.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1986
A.K. Allen, "The Ladies Club" (New Line); Laurie . Anderson, "Home of the Brave" (Cinecom); Ronee Blakley, "I Played It for You" (AUC Films); Lizzie Borden, "Working Girls" (no distributor); Zane Buzby, "Last Resort" (Concorde); Joyce Chopra, "Smooth Talk" (Spectrafilm); Joan Darling, "The Check Is in the Mail" (Ascot); Donna Deitch, "Desert Hearts" (Goldwyn); Sara Driver, "Sleepwalk" (no distributor); Linda Feferman, "Seven Minutes in Heaven" (Warner Bros.
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