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Zachary Richard

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
Zachary Richard is considered a zydeco performer, but the Louisiana-based accordionist-vocalist served up very little straight zydeco before a packed house (heavy with bayou region transplants) at the Palomino on Friday. Richard's pan-Louisiana smorgasbord of styles ably fulfilled the prime requirement of a good bar band by keeping the dance floor active throughout his hour-long second set, but offered little beyond that.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1993 | RANDY LEWIS
Zachary Richard led a save-the-fragile-Cajun-culture campaign at the Coach House on Wednesday, but for all his informed song introductions and stories about what inspired various tunes, Richard (who also appears at the Troubadour tonight) only intermittently displayed the poetic talent to get his point across. As a lyricist, he aspires to be Cajun music's Tennessee Williams or William Faulkner, writing about the richness of his people and their land.
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NEWS
November 12, 1992 | RANDY LEWIS
Early in his career, Zachary Richard (pronounced ree-SHARD) was dubbed the "Cajun Mick Jagger"--his flamboyant, swaggering performance style helped him make him the first person to ever look sexy playing an accordion.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cajun musicians are commonly assumed to come in one of two stereotypical packages. There's the wild man of the swamps epitomized by Doug Kershaw--eyes bugging, feet stomping, voice box yee-hawing as he does his best to come off as a fellow who may at one time have wrassled with alligators. Then there is the folk-traditionalist, the serious preserver of Cajun songs passed down from people who played on front porches and at community dances. Zachary Richard doesn't fit either description.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cajun musicians are commonly assumed to come in one of two stereotypical packages. There's the wild man of the swamps epitomized by Doug Kershaw--eyes bugging, feet stomping, voice box yee-hawing as he does his best to come off as a fellow who may at one time have wrassled with alligators. Then there is the folk-traditionalist, the serious preserver of Cajun songs passed down from people who played on front porches and at community dances. Zachary Richard doesn't fit either description.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1993 | RANDY LEWIS
Zachary Richard led a save-the-fragile-Cajun-culture campaign at the Coach House on Wednesday, but for all his informed song introductions and stories about what inspired various tunes, Richard (who also appears at the Troubadour tonight) only intermittently displayed the poetic talent to get his point across. As a lyricist, he aspires to be Cajun music's Tennessee Williams or William Faulkner, writing about the richness of his people and their land.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1989 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Accordionist Zachary Richard once was known as the "bad boy of Cajun music." Now he's trying to be its good example. A long-time crusader for the preservation of the French culture and language from which Louisiana's Cajun communities sprang, the 38-year-old Richard (pronounced Ree-SHARD) earned a reputation for stridence in his campaign, both on stage and off. It had a particular intensity in the mid-'70s when Richard returned to his Lafayette, La.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1990 | JOHN PENNER
Zachary Richard, typically prone to long, winding dissertations when queried about his two favorite subjects--himself and his music--on odd occasion waxes succinct. "Basically, I'm just a French pop singer," he says. And his offbeat yet accessible blend of Cajun rock, he says, boils down to simply "Southern Louisiana dance music." Not bad, as thesis statements go.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | RANDY LEWIS
Created as an audio companion to a new coffee table photography book with the same name, this new compilation just may be the single best introduction one can get to the uniquely joyful indigenous music of Southwestern Louisiana. Represented are such seminal names as fiddlers Dennis McGee, Canray Fontenot and Dewey Balfa, tradition-minded Cajun accordionists Marc Savoy and Steve Riley, zydeco kingpins Clifton Chenier and Boozoo Chavis and modern-day innovators Beausoleil and Zachary Richard.
NEWS
June 22, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM
Advice to musical snackers attending this year's Taste of Orange County: Get a good helping of the festival's ample roots offerings, and we don't mean radishes, carrots and rutabagas. On tap are such illustrious figures as B.B. King, the blues master who is a prime contender for the title of dean of American roots music, even if he is seldom seen without formal wear.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | RANDY LEWIS
Early in his career, Zachary Richard (pronounced ree-SHARD) was dubbed the "Cajun Mick Jagger"--his flamboyant, swaggering performance style helped him make him the first person to ever look sexy playing an accordion.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1990 | JOHN PENNER
Zachary Richard, typically prone to long, winding dissertations when queried about his two favorite subjects--himself and his music--on odd occasion waxes succinct. "Basically, I'm just a French pop singer," he says. And his offbeat yet accessible blend of Cajun rock, he says, boils down to simply "Southern Louisiana dance music." Not bad, as thesis statements go.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1989 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Accordionist Zachary Richard once was known as the "bad boy of Cajun music." Now he's trying to be its good example. A long-time crusader for the preservation of the French culture and language from which Louisiana's Cajun communities sprang, the 38-year-old Richard (pronounced Ree-SHARD) earned a reputation for stridence in his campaign, both on stage and off. It had a particular intensity in the mid-'70s when Richard returned to his Lafayette, La.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
Zachary Richard is considered a zydeco performer, but the Louisiana-based accordionist-vocalist served up very little straight zydeco before a packed house (heavy with bayou region transplants) at the Palomino on Friday. Richard's pan-Louisiana smorgasbord of styles ably fulfilled the prime requirement of a good bar band by keeping the dance floor active throughout his hour-long second set, but offered little beyond that.
NEWS
November 4, 1993 | RANDY LEWIS
Sonny Landreth makes good on the title of his debut solo album by digging his heels deep into the rich musical soil of his native Louisiana. As a guitarist, he found himself in front of pop audiences touring with John Hiatt in recent years. Before that, he had played with Zachary Richard, one of the preeminent Cajun rockers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1993 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
"Now, this is what I call a party," said the man with the black Chargers cap, waving a beer in toast Saturday night as he stood by the Louisiana Heritage stage near the end of the 10th annual San Diego Street Scene. There was still 90 minutes left before the warm, invigorating two-day music and food fair concluded, but the 32-year-old North County machinist was calling it a night.
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