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NEWS
May 9, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even a few years ago, it would have been much simpler: Send in a company of Foreign Legion paratroopers, or even more French military muscle, and patch up yet another African crisis to keep a friendly "Big Man" in power. But that hasn't happened in Zaire, and the swelling death rattle of Marshal Mobutu Sese Seko's 32-year-old reign over Central Africa's long-suffering heart has come as an enormous shock and humiliation for France.
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SPORTS
June 25, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Dwyane Wade's 10-year-old son, Zaire Wade, seems to have inherited much of his father's basketball skills. How much? So much that the fifth-grader feels comfortable trash talking his pop, who just won his third NBA title with the Miami Heat last week. The day after getting dunked on by Chicago's Taj Gibson last month, the elder Wade described his ever-compassionate son's reaction on Twitter: I had 2 laugh at ths..I was playing my oldest son Zaire on his nerf rim & he dunked & said Gibson while screaming..L2MS Kids u gotta luv em - THREE (@DwyaneWade)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1996
Helen Winternitz's claim that "Zaire's tortured history began in the late 15th century, when the Portuguese sailed down Africa's west coast and found the Kongo Kingdom" (Opinion, Nov. 10) innocently reflects the Eurocentrism of so many Western observers. Zaire's history started when the area was first occupied by people. Central Africa was not some sort of savage paradise when the first Europeans "discovered" the Kongo Kingdom. For sure, much of Zaire's agony for the past 36 years since independence can be attributed to external influences of the Cold War. The root causes lie as much or more, however, in the basic system of beliefs and values of the various Zairian cultures.
SPORTS
September 14, 2012 | By Dan Loumena
Muhammad Ali, perhaps the greatest sportsman to grace the international stage, received the Liberty Medal on Thursday at Philadelphia's National Constitution Center. The honor is bestowed on those who fight for humanitarian causes, civil rights and religious freedom. A $100,000 cash prize is awarded to the recipient. Ali, now 70 and stricken with Parkinson's disease, did not speak during the ceremony. His wife, Lonnie, and daughter, Laila, spoke on his behalf. "You know, my father loves people and people love my father, and I learned that at a very young age, as people would always come up to him wherever we went," his daughter said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1997
I have been watching the rebel takeover in Zaire on television. I am sick to my stomach watching young boys cruelly beating and executing other boys without benefit of trial or proper inquiry. What an abysmal thing it is to be shown once again what a terribly flawed species humankind is--all over the planet--to be able to create for ourselves a mind-set which allows us to kill for spite and sport. And to realize what an underachiever God is. SHELDON KELLER Los Angeles The front-page photo of a Zairian execution (May 19)
NEWS
October 11, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Rwanda's president vowed to bar ethnic Tutsi men ordered to leave Zaire next week or face all-out war as rebels. "We will only be taking women and children. The men will have to stay where they are," Rwandan President Pasteur Bizimungu said. Zaire has given an estimated 200,000 Banyamulenge Tutsis one week to leave or be treated as rebels and face war with Zairian soldiers.
NEWS
June 19, 1989
Cardinal Joseph Malula, 71, who fought for church rights in Zaire. Malula, a native of the former Belgian Congo, was appointed archbishop of Kinshasa, the capital, in 1964. Five years later, Pope Paul VI elevated him to cardinal. In the early 1970s, President Mobutu Sese Seko launched an Africanization program that tried to sharply curtail the power of the church. Malula protested, was denounced by Mobutu, and went into exile in Rome. The restrictions proved unpopular and were gradually lifted.
NEWS
September 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
Mobutu Sese Seko, shunned in death by the powers that once backed his despotic rule over Zaire, was laid to rest Saturday after a private Roman Catholic ceremony outside the Moroccan capital. Nearly 100 uniformed and plainclothes police kept journalists and onlookers 500 yards from the cemetery as mourners arrived in private cars. Mobutu's body was carried in a white ambulance.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Zairian guards evacuated nearly 400 Belgians from riot-torn Zaire on Saturday aboard President Mobutu Sese Seko's personal yacht after telling Belgian commandos not to intervene following two days of fierce rioting. The refugees, mostly Belgian but including about 60 Germans, 35 Israelis and a handful of other nationalities, were taken to neighboring Congo to escape army-led rioting that has killed more than 45 people since Thursday, including the French ambassador.
NEWS
May 17, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Hutus armed with machetes hunted down hundreds of Tutsis who sought refuge in a church in Zaire and slaughtered at least 12 of them, a U.N. official said. More than 100 other Tutsis hiding in the church were missing. At least 600 Tutsis had fled armed Hutu mobs to Kichanga, near Zaire's border with Rwanda, said the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Most everyone remembers "The Rumble in the Jungle," the 1974 heavyweight championship fight between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman in Kinshasa, Zaire, but who remembers "Zaire 74," the music festival that was organized to go along with it? "Soul Power," a vibrant and joyous new documentary, should end that anonymity. One reason the concert is little known is that a training camp injury to Foreman led to a six-week postponement of the fight.
NEWS
August 19, 2001 | TIM SULLIVAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Like its former master, this city of jungle palaces has died. The dinner parties, drenched in pink champagne and filled with shady millionaires, are no more. The fake Louis XIV furniture has been looted. The dictator, who transformed his ancestral village into a monument to kleptocratic kitsch, lies buried in Morocco.
NEWS
September 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
Mobutu Sese Seko, shunned in death by the powers that once backed his despotic rule over Zaire, was laid to rest Saturday after a private Roman Catholic ceremony outside the Moroccan capital. Nearly 100 uniformed and plainclothes police kept journalists and onlookers 500 yards from the cemetery as mourners arrived in private cars. Mobutu's body was carried in a white ambulance.
NEWS
September 8, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mobutu Sese Seko, the Zairian leader toppled in May after nearly 32 years of despotic rule that enriched him and his friends but left his country in shambles, has died in Morocco, Radio France Info reported early today. He was 66. Mobutu had been suffering from prostate cancer. There was no immediate word on the cause of his death.
NEWS
July 9, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Rwanda's powerful defense minister, Paul Kagame, has acknowledged for the first time his country's key role in the overthrow of Zairian President Mobutu Sese Seko, saying that the Rwandan government planned and directed the rebellion that toppled the longtime dictator and that Rwandan troops and officers led the rebel forces.
NEWS
June 18, 1997 | BOB DROGIN and MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Times dispatched Johannesburg bureau chief Bob Drogin and Berlin bureau chief Mary Williams Walsh to Zaire to cover the fall of Mobutu Sese Seko. This joint account of their adventure begins in Drogin's voice; the italics are Walsh. * This city was wild in the best of times. And this was the eve of war. Two days before, I had flown in a South African military cargo plane to Pointe-Noire to cover last-ditch peace talks between Zairian rulers and rebels.
NEWS
May 17, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He styled himself Mobutu Sese Seko Kuku Ngbendu wa za Banga, a name that means "the all-powerful warrior who because of his endurance and inflexible will to win will go from conquest to conquest leaving fire in his wake." But in the end, Africa's longest-serving dictator was powerless and conquered, his will broken by cancer and his claims to glory in shambles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1997 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leon Gast, director of the Muhammad Ali documentary "When We Were Kings," acknowledges that Taylor Hackford "brought the film into the '90s" after it languished unreleased for 22 years. Yet on Oscar night, Hackford received neither a statuette nor even a thank you. The documentary feature category permits a maximum of two people to receive the award, which in this case went to Gast and another producer, David Sonenberg.
NEWS
May 31, 1997
The United Nations decided this week to recognize the name change of the country formerly called "Zaire" to the "Democratic Republic of Congo." The country's new government, led by President Laurent Kabila, had announced the change when it seized power this month. The Times will adopt the new name, beginning with today's editions. The country will be referred to as "Congo."
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