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NEWS
May 7, 1997 | JIM MANN
Two aging dictators began this year seeking to hold onto power in huge, mineral-rich Third World countries. One of them is thriving, the other is about to fall. The interesting question is: Why do the two men seem headed for such different fates? The dictators are Presidents Suharto of Indonesia and Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire. Both men have ruled their nations for more than three decades, since the days of Lyndon B. Johnson's presidency.
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NEWS
May 7, 1997 | JIM MANN
Two aging dictators began this year seeking to hold onto power in huge, mineral-rich Third World countries. One of them is thriving, the other is about to fall. The interesting question is: Why do the two men seem headed for such different fates? The dictators are Presidents Suharto of Indonesia and Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire. Both men have ruled their nations for more than three decades, since the days of Lyndon B. Johnson's presidency.
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NEWS
May 7, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mobutu Sese Seko announced plans Tuesday to travel today to a summit of regional leaders in Gabon in what appeared to be the first step in an exit strategy before a threatened assault on this capital by rebel troops.
NEWS
May 7, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mobutu Sese Seko announced plans Tuesday to travel today to a summit of regional leaders in Gabon in what appeared to be the first step in an exit strategy before a threatened assault on this capital by rebel troops.
NEWS
December 18, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His step was slow, his body appeared frail and his voice often faltered. But Mobutu Sese Seko, Africa's longest-serving ruler and some say one of its most venal tyrants, clearly basked in the glow of a triumphant return home Tuesday after four months in Europe for cancer treatment. His country, as well as the world, was paying notice.
NEWS
October 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A fresh explosion of looting has swept Lubumbashi, Zaire's major copper-mining town, witnesses arriving in the capital of Kinshasa reported. "They looted everything, all night," one said. "They've stripped the face of the town." The Central African country remained locked in a power struggle between President Mobutu Sese Seko and opposition Prime Minister Etienne Tshisekedi, whom Mobutu has tried to fire.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Mobutu Sese Seko said he is withdrawing his nomination of an opponent to the prime minister's job and plans to keep control of the army, a Western diplomat said. Mobutu told Western ambassadors that the opposition figure, Etienne Tshisekedi, had insulted him by stating that he planned to strip all important powers from Mobutu, Zaire's dictatorial ruler for 26 years.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Zairian President Mobutu Sese Seko's special militia attacked crowds backing Prime Minister Etienne Tshisekedi after he refused to step down on Mobutu's orders. Units of Mobutu's civil guard used tear gas and fired shots into the air to disperse about 15,000 Tshisekedi supporters outside the prime minister's office. Witnesses said Mobutu's militia smashed Tshisekedi's car. There were no reports of serious injuries.
NEWS
March 25, 1997 | From Associated Press
Prime Minister Leon Kengo wa Dondo resigned Monday, bowing to pressure from lawmakers who blamed him for mishandling an insurgency by rebels who now control nearly a quarter of the country. Kengo's departure came a day after his mentor, President Mobutu Sese Seko, emerged from seclusion, promising to make clear "within 48 hours" his plans to reunite the country. Parliament had voted last week to oust Kengo, accusing him of being soft on the insurgents.
NEWS
February 7, 1993 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Etienne Tshisekedi said Saturday that President Mobutu Sese Seko had no legal right to fire him and he would not leave office. In a televised speech Friday night, Mobutu blamed Tshisekedi for riots in which at least 80 people were killed and said he would ask the transitional Parliament to name a new premier. Tshisekedi, chosen last August by the pro-democracy forum, said an interim constitution approved by the conference took away Mobutu's power to hire and fire prime ministers.
NEWS
April 10, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States on Wednesday called for order and concrete steps toward democracy in Zaire, but the Clinton administration's entreaties went unheeded as the large Central African country cascaded further into bloody chaos.
NEWS
April 9, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The Clinton administration has been pressing President Mobutu Sese Seko, a U.S. ally for 25 years, to resign and go into exile to help his nation achieve a settlement to civil war, according to a senior administration official. Although the administration has stopped short of publicly urging Mobutu to step down, Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs George E. Moose called Mobutu's regime "bankrupt" and "a thing of the past."
NEWS
April 3, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
President Mobutu Sese Seko formally approved the appointment of archrival Etienne Tshisekedi as prime minister. State radio announced the appointment as the United Nations refugee agency started repatriating 3,000 Rwandan Hutus from Zaire, and a U.N. investigator, after a three-day probe, accused rebels of massacring Hutus last year. Lawmakers had nominated Tshisekedi to head the government and steer Zaire through negotiations with rebel chief Laurent Kabila.
NEWS
March 25, 1997 | From Associated Press
Prime Minister Leon Kengo wa Dondo resigned Monday, bowing to pressure from lawmakers who blamed him for mishandling an insurgency by rebels who now control nearly a quarter of the country. Kengo's departure came a day after his mentor, President Mobutu Sese Seko, emerged from seclusion, promising to make clear "within 48 hours" his plans to reunite the country. Parliament had voted last week to oust Kengo, accusing him of being soft on the insurgents.
NEWS
March 23, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fresh flowers fill crystal vases. Recessed lights shine on rich rugs and marble floors. Silk pillows hug leather couches. Beethoven plays softly from speakers hidden in the walls. The plush hilltop villa, and the shiny Jaguar parked outside, belong to one of Zaire's most powerful men. He is a Cabinet minister, a former ambassador and a key member of ailing President Mobutu Sese Seko's tottering regime.
NEWS
March 22, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a tale of two cities, but it speaks volumes about the dying days of Africa's longest-surviving dictatorship. President Mobutu Sese Seko flew home to this crumbling capital Friday from cancer treatment in Europe. But after his jet landed, security agents ordered Cabinet ministers, military commanders, an honor guard and reporters from the airport so no one could see the ailing ruler climb--or be carried--down the stairs.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | Associated Press
Zaire President Mobutu Sese Seko has fired two high-ranking officials for what was described by Radio Zaire as a breach of party discipline. Kinshasa Gov. Mbuji Wa Mbombo and Vunduame To Pemako, the state commissioner for territorial administration, were relieved of their posts, the broadcast monitored in Abidjan said. It did not give details of their dismissal.
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Zaire's embattled prime minister was ousted from power Tuesday, deepening the political crisis brought on by the fast-spreading civil war in sub-Saharan Africa's second-largest country. Leon Kengo wa Dondo was toppled by a vote of Parliament in the capital, Kinshasa, shortly after he flew here to meet African leaders to discuss the insurrection that has swept eastern Zaire and threatens to engulf the giant country.
NEWS
December 18, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His step was slow, his body appeared frail and his voice often faltered. But Mobutu Sese Seko, Africa's longest-serving ruler and some say one of its most venal tyrants, clearly basked in the glow of a triumphant return home Tuesday after four months in Europe for cancer treatment. His country, as well as the world, was paying notice.
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