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Zaire Government Officials

NEWS
April 3, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
President Mobutu Sese Seko formally approved the appointment of archrival Etienne Tshisekedi as prime minister. State radio announced the appointment as the United Nations refugee agency started repatriating 3,000 Rwandan Hutus from Zaire, and a U.N. investigator, after a three-day probe, accused rebels of massacring Hutus last year. Lawmakers had nominated Tshisekedi to head the government and steer Zaire through negotiations with rebel chief Laurent Kabila.
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NEWS
May 30, 1997 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks after chasing a hated dictator from power, guerrilla leader Laurent Kabila had himself sworn in as president here Thursday, telling a stadium filled with 30,000 cheering supporters that he would guide the nation to free elections in April 1999.
NEWS
April 9, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The Clinton administration has been pressing President Mobutu Sese Seko, a U.S. ally for 25 years, to resign and go into exile to help his nation achieve a settlement to civil war, according to a senior administration official. Although the administration has stopped short of publicly urging Mobutu to step down, Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs George E. Moose called Mobutu's regime "bankrupt" and "a thing of the past."
NEWS
March 22, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a tale of two cities, but it speaks volumes about the dying days of Africa's longest-surviving dictatorship. President Mobutu Sese Seko flew home to this crumbling capital Friday from cancer treatment in Europe. But after his jet landed, security agents ordered Cabinet ministers, military commanders, an honor guard and reporters from the airport so no one could see the ailing ruler climb--or be carried--down the stairs.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | BOB DROGIN and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Daniel Schroeder, a ramrod-straight soldier with a closely shaved head and a razor-sharp manner, paused only once in his rapid-fire answers to a gaggle of reporters at a recent briefing here. Schroeder, head of the task force running Operation Support Hope, the U.S. attempt to alleviate the suffering of more than 1 million Rwandan refugees, said he was considering using an American truck company to transport food and refugees in Rwanda.
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