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Zaire Government

NEWS
March 6, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The government, reeling from a series of battlefield losses to rebels, accepted a United Nations cease-fire proposal. But the rebels, on the verge of capturing the provincial capital of Kisangani after weeks of fighting, may not be ready to put down their arms yet. Meanwhile, the government ordered 19 U.N. relief workers and 38 other international aid specialists expelled.
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NEWS
May 20, 1997 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The military offensive of Zaire's new de facto president, Laurent Kabila, is over, but the political war has just begun. As the rebel leader prepared to present his new government to the world today, members of the country's political opposition expressed concern that they would be excluded from key positions. Radical politicians say it is they who deserve much of the credit for the political demise of former President Mobutu Sese Seko, and they are eager to be rewarded for their efforts.
NEWS
February 18, 1997 | From the Washington Post
The government Monday rejected a U.N. appeal for a truce in the war in eastern Zaire and, vowing to crush the rebels there, dispatched warplanes to bomb at least one guerrilla-held town. Three Zairian planes dropped bombs on Bukavu, on the border with Rwanda. Aid workers reached by telephone there reported that three planes dropped four bombs, including one that landed on the town's market. They said up to nine people were killed.
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mobutu Sese Seko made a belated return to his capital Saturday, dashing hopes that he was on his way into exile, but efforts to negotiate an orderly end to his rule continued. While Mobutu was en route from Gabon, South African Deputy President Thabo Mbeki announced in the Gabonese capital, Libreville, that Mobutu had agreed to hold one more round of talks with his archrival, guerrilla leader Laurent Kabila, and discuss a transfer of power.
NEWS
May 18, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight months ago, virtually no one outside a small group of Africa specialists had a clue who Laurent Kabila was. The 59-year-old revolutionary was a forgotten figure, waging a seemingly futile insurgency in the mountains of eastern Zaire. Today, Kabila is in the international spotlight, hailed by Zairians as the man who unyoked their exhausted country from the 32-year dictatorship of Mobutu Sese Seko--but even now, few can honestly say they know who Laurent Kabila really is. Marxist fossil?
NEWS
March 26, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to preserve some remnant of its fast-fading power, President Mobutu Sese Seko's regime Tuesday proposed the creation of a seven-member council to seek negotiations and a cease-fire with rebels who have vowed to topple him. The apparent concession came after heavy diplomatic lobbying by Washington and other governments anxious to prevent further widening of the five-month conflict.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
The government here rejected a U.N. proposal to end Zaire's civil war, describing it Wednesday as a "timid advance" that fails to condemn neighboring African countries for supporting the rebels. Nevertheless, South African President Nelson Mandela said the two sides may begin peace talks as early as today. "The contending parties in that conflict . . . have made a request that they would like to meet in South Africa," Mandela said in Cape Town after holding talks with African leaders.
NEWS
April 4, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Just a day after becoming Zairian prime minister, Etienne Tshisekedi announced that he was annulling the constitution, dissolving the Parliament and offering six Cabinet seats to the rebels. The rebels rejected the offer of Cabinet posts, saying that to accept them would be inconsistent with their goal of deposing President Mobutu Sese Seko. And some politicians questioned Tshisekedi's authority to make the other changes.
NEWS
October 5, 1991 | From Associated Press
Embattled President Mobutu Sese Seku and his chief opponent hit a new impasse Friday in their talks on forming a new government, as France and Belgium announced the withdrawal of some of their soldiers from Zaire. Officials from the two countries said 290 soldiers were being flown out of Zaire and said the 1,100 Western troops remaining would not be used to prop up Mobutu. Most of the soldiers are in Kinshasa, the capital.
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mobutu Sese Seko failed to return to this capital city as planned Friday amid growing signs that he will meet again next week with his guerrilla opponent, Laurent Kabila, and seek an orderly transition of power in Zaire. Earlier in the week, Mobutu's aides had insisted that the president would return to Kinshasa on Friday after holding talks with other French-speaking African leaders in Libreville, Gabon.
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