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NEWS
May 16, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anxious health officials warned Monday that an outbreak of incurable Ebola disease is still raging near the town of Kikwit, and that two suspected cases of the deadly virus have now been found here in the crowded capital. Abdelhalim Senouci, director of the international federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent societies in Central Africa, said that "the situation is still not stable" in Kikwit.
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NEWS
August 25, 1995 | Reuters
The World Health Organization declared Thursday that an outbreak in Zaire of the deadly Ebola disease was officially over after killing 244 of its 315 known victims.
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NEWS
May 15, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sister Dinarosa Belleri, an Italian nursing nun who devoted nearly three decades to serving the poor and sick here, had an unusual funeral Sunday in the sad and dusty graveyard behind the city's cathedral. The coffin came on a hospital gurney. The five pallbearers wore full-length green gowns, heavy plastic goggles, surgical face masks, white helmets, thick gloves and knee-high rubber boots. They nearly dropped the casket before nervously lowering it into the freshly dug grave.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
A 36-year-old laboratory worker triggered April's outbreak of Ebola fever in Zaire although the virus first struck in January, a team of international doctors and scientists said today. In a letter published in the Lancet medical magazine, they said the outbreak started April 9 when the man was transferred between hospitals in Kikwit, east of the capital Kinshasa. They gave no details about how he contracted Ebola.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a window into the implacable difficulties of fighting AIDS in Africa's hinterland, consider the fate of one of the most successful education and prevention programs ever: a plan to get Zairean men accustomed to the idea of using condoms. Using a technique known as "social marketing," in which public health ideas are sold to mass markets just like soap or beer, an American nonprofit group financed by the U.S.
NEWS
May 18, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
An outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus has entered a new phase in Zaire, spreading to the community at large, doctors in this town at the center of the epidemic said Wednesday. "There are people dying in the city. . . . Now it is showing up among people in the community," said Dr. Mungala Kipasa, director of Kikwit General Hospital. Many of Mungala's best staff have been wiped out by the lethal virus, which kills 90% of its victims and for which there is no known vaccine or cure.
NEWS
May 14, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The small diplomatic community in this dismally poor capital had gathered to toast the wedding of a German envoy to a British colleague last weekend when John Yates, the top U.S. diplomat, heard "something that sounded strange." "It was a person from the Vatican Embassy," recalled Yates, the charge d'affaires at the U.S. Embassy in Zaire. ". . . He told us that some Italian nuns that he knew had died. He described what happened. And the missionary doctor who was there said, 'Ebola.'
NEWS
May 19, 1995 | From Associated Press
A leading virologist criticized the government's response to the Ebola epidemic Thursday, saying that roadblocks and quarantines are a waste of valuable time in the race to contain the killer virus. Instead of putting more soldiers on the highway to prevent stricken people from traveling, more doctors and equipment should be sent to the disease's epicenter, said Dr. Jean-Jacques Muyembe, who helped identify the Ebola virus 19 years ago.
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | From Associated Press
The death toll from the Ebola virus outbreak in Zaire has risen to 108, the World Health Organization reported Wednesday. A Swiss woman suspected of having the disease was identified as a news photographer sent to cover the story. Katja Snozzi, 48, returned from Zaire last week and was hospitalized with fever, one of the early symptoms of Ebola and other tropical diseases.
NEWS
June 2, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
A 36-year-old laboratory worker triggered April's outbreak of Ebola fever in Zaire although the virus first struck in January, a team of international doctors and scientists said today. In a letter published in the Lancet medical magazine, they said the outbreak started April 9 when the man was transferred between hospitals in Kikwit, east of the capital Kinshasa. They gave no details about how he contracted Ebola.
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | From Associated Press
The death toll from the Ebola virus outbreak in Zaire has risen to 108, the World Health Organization reported Wednesday. A Swiss woman suspected of having the disease was identified as a news photographer sent to cover the story. Katja Snozzi, 48, returned from Zaire last week and was hospitalized with fever, one of the early symptoms of Ebola and other tropical diseases.
NEWS
May 22, 1995 | Associated Press
The death toll from the Ebola virus climbed to 101 on Sunday, and health workers said the epidemic may have started as long ago as December--three months earlier than previously thought. Medical workers scouring Kikwit, a city of 600,000 where the outbreak was previously believed to have started in mid-March, found hospital records linking the virus to a household of 12 people of whom seven died in December.
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Another Italian nun based in the town of Kikwit in Zaire has contracted the deadly Ebola virus that has already killed five of her colleagues together with scores of local people, her order said Saturday. Father Arturo Bellini, a spokesman in Bergamo, Italy, for the Little Sisters of the Poor, which is based in Bergamo and specializes in medicine, identified the nun as Annelvira Ossoli.
NEWS
May 19, 1995 | From Associated Press
A leading virologist criticized the government's response to the Ebola epidemic Thursday, saying that roadblocks and quarantines are a waste of valuable time in the race to contain the killer virus. Instead of putting more soldiers on the highway to prevent stricken people from traveling, more doctors and equipment should be sent to the disease's epicenter, said Dr. Jean-Jacques Muyembe, who helped identify the Ebola virus 19 years ago.
NEWS
May 18, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
An outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus has entered a new phase in Zaire, spreading to the community at large, doctors in this town at the center of the epidemic said Wednesday. "There are people dying in the city. . . . Now it is showing up among people in the community," said Dr. Mungala Kipasa, director of Kikwit General Hospital. Many of Mungala's best staff have been wiped out by the lethal virus, which kills 90% of its victims and for which there is no known vaccine or cure.
NEWS
May 17, 1995 | Associated Press
With the threat of the deadly Ebola virus looming over this capital of at least 4 million, doctors and nurses created a hospital isolation ward Tuesday for the city's first possible carriers. Officials have been struggling to contain the virus within the region surrounding Kikwit, a city of 600,000 where the outbreak began. Eighty-six people had died of the disease as of Tuesday.
NEWS
May 17, 1995 | Associated Press
With the threat of the deadly Ebola virus looming over this capital of at least 4 million, doctors and nurses created a hospital isolation ward Tuesday for the city's first possible carriers. Officials have been struggling to contain the virus within the region surrounding Kikwit, a city of 600,000 where the outbreak began. Eighty-six people had died of the disease as of Tuesday.
NEWS
August 25, 1995 | Reuters
The World Health Organization declared Thursday that an outbreak in Zaire of the deadly Ebola disease was officially over after killing 244 of its 315 known victims.
NEWS
May 16, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anxious health officials warned Monday that an outbreak of incurable Ebola disease is still raging near the town of Kikwit, and that two suspected cases of the deadly virus have now been found here in the crowded capital. Abdelhalim Senouci, director of the international federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent societies in Central Africa, said that "the situation is still not stable" in Kikwit.
NEWS
May 15, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sister Dinarosa Belleri, an Italian nursing nun who devoted nearly three decades to serving the poor and sick here, had an unusual funeral Sunday in the sad and dusty graveyard behind the city's cathedral. The coffin came on a hospital gurney. The five pallbearers wore full-length green gowns, heavy plastic goggles, surgical face masks, white helmets, thick gloves and knee-high rubber boots. They nearly dropped the casket before nervously lowering it into the freshly dug grave.
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