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Zaire Health

NEWS
May 21, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Another Italian nun based in the town of Kikwit in Zaire has contracted the deadly Ebola virus that has already killed five of her colleagues together with scores of local people, her order said Saturday. Father Arturo Bellini, a spokesman in Bergamo, Italy, for the Little Sisters of the Poor, which is based in Bergamo and specializes in medicine, identified the nun as Annelvira Ossoli.
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NEWS
May 22, 1995 | Associated Press
The death toll from the Ebola virus climbed to 101 on Sunday, and health workers said the epidemic may have started as long ago as December--three months earlier than previously thought. Medical workers scouring Kikwit, a city of 600,000 where the outbreak was previously believed to have started in mid-March, found hospital records linking the virus to a household of 12 people of whom seven died in December.
NEWS
May 13, 1995 | From Associated Press
Fear of contagion laced the grief of relatives who kept their death watch Friday in a cemetery where authorities handed over victims in coffins sealed to stop the spread of a dreaded virus. Two small boys in the crowd of about 50 people pulled T-shirts over their faces in a misguided attempt to protect themselves from the deadly Ebola virus that swept through Kikwit.
NEWS
May 12, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As scientists confirmed Thursday that Ebola hemorrhagic fever was the cause of a lethal outbreak in Zaire, African authorities took extraordinary measures to contain the virus' spread and the panic it can cause. World Health Organization officials who arrived at the original infection site--the village of Kikwit, about 250 miles east of the Zairian capital of Kinshasa--said they found the 350-bed hospital where most victims had been now was abandoned, except for about 20 patients.
NEWS
May 10, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
A mysterious lethal virus has broken out in Zaire, killing at least 56 people and prompting government officials to place parts of the country under quarantine, health officials said Tuesday. The most likely cause is Ebola, one of the world's deadliest viruses, officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. Ebola, which causes hemorrhaging, fevers and vomiting, kills about 90% of those it infects, and there is no treatment or vaccine.
NEWS
September 10, 1995 | ROBERT WELLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As the only surgeon left in the Congo's main hospital in Leopoldville during the civil war of 1960, American missionary Bill Close was overwhelmed tending the wounds of battling African tribesmen, policemen and soldiers. Then he thought about seeking help from a young colonel named Joseph Mobutu (later to become Mobutu Sese Seko), who had seized power after the country he later renamed Zaire was granted independence from Belgium.
NEWS
November 14, 1988 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
In the vibrant cite section of town, Mpasi, a 27-year-old army lieutenant, cast his eye over the well-dressed women occupying the velour couches of the Cosmos 2000 nightclub. "Most of the women here are 'free,' " he observed approvingly. "You can just go ahead and dance with any of them."
NEWS
November 6, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The quivering voice was that of a middle-aged woman turning to a radio talk show for advice. "My husband was in the hospital and received two blood transfusions," she confided over the air this week. "I am worried. What do I do?" The reply was as simple as it was startling: Tell him to get an AIDS test--now.
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