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Zaire Military Assaults

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NEWS
February 9, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebel forces in eastern Zaire have achieved major territorial gains in the past week and now, for the first time, appear to seriously threaten the government of one of Africa's largest nations. United Nations officials, diplomats and military experts who closely follow the war say the guerrillas have smashed a long-promised counteroffensive launched with much fanfare Jan. 20 by Zairian troops and several hundred mercenaries, mostly French and Serb.
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NEWS
February 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
The government here rejected a U.N. proposal to end Zaire's civil war, describing it Wednesday as a "timid advance" that fails to condemn neighboring African countries for supporting the rebels. Nevertheless, South African President Nelson Mandela said the two sides may begin peace talks as early as today. "The contending parties in that conflict . . . have made a request that they would like to meet in South Africa," Mandela said in Cape Town after holding talks with African leaders.
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NEWS
February 18, 1997 | From the Washington Post
The government Monday rejected a U.N. appeal for a truce in the war in eastern Zaire and, vowing to crush the rebels there, dispatched warplanes to bomb at least one guerrilla-held town. Three Zairian planes dropped bombs on Bukavu, on the border with Rwanda. Aid workers reached by telephone there reported that three planes dropped four bombs, including one that landed on the town's market. They said up to nine people were killed.
NEWS
February 18, 1997 | From the Washington Post
The government Monday rejected a U.N. appeal for a truce in the war in eastern Zaire and, vowing to crush the rebels there, dispatched warplanes to bomb at least one guerrilla-held town. Three Zairian planes dropped bombs on Bukavu, on the border with Rwanda. Aid workers reached by telephone there reported that three planes dropped four bombs, including one that landed on the town's market. They said up to nine people were killed.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
The government here rejected a U.N. proposal to end Zaire's civil war, describing it Wednesday as a "timid advance" that fails to condemn neighboring African countries for supporting the rebels. Nevertheless, South African President Nelson Mandela said the two sides may begin peace talks as early as today. "The contending parties in that conflict . . . have made a request that they would like to meet in South Africa," Mandela said in Cape Town after holding talks with African leaders.
NEWS
February 9, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebel forces in eastern Zaire have achieved major territorial gains in the past week and now, for the first time, appear to seriously threaten the government of one of Africa's largest nations. United Nations officials, diplomats and military experts who closely follow the war say the guerrillas have smashed a long-promised counteroffensive launched with much fanfare Jan. 20 by Zairian troops and several hundred mercenaries, mostly French and Serb.
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