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June 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Barge Operator to Acquire Rival: Tidewater Inc., a large operator of boats and barges for off-shore oil operations, will acquire Houston-based Zapata Gulf Marine Corp., creating the largest firm of its kind in the world. The $407-million acquisition will give New Orleans-based Tidewater 576 vessels ranging from towing and supply boats to barges.
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BUSINESS
June 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Barge Operator to Acquire Rival: Tidewater Inc., a large operator of boats and barges for off-shore oil operations, will acquire Houston-based Zapata Gulf Marine Corp., creating the largest firm of its kind in the world. The $407-million acquisition will give New Orleans-based Tidewater 576 vessels ranging from towing and supply boats to barges.
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NEWS
October 13, 1988 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Cuban officials Wednesday released a small American vessel carrying strange cargo--New Zealand's America's Cup sailboat--after holding it for 23 1/2 hours. A Cuban gunboat had intercepted the offshore oil supply vessel Tampa Seahorse on Tuesday, alleging it had penetrated the island's claimed 12-mile territorial limit en route from San Diego to New York, via the Panama Canal. The United States generally recognizes only 3-mile limits for international waters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1988 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
A small vessel carrying New Zealand's massive America's Cup sailboat from San Diego to New York was seized by a Cuban gunboat and taken into port Tuesday afternoon. According to the U. S. Coast Guard in Miami, the Cubans said the 156-foot, offshore oil-support ship Tampa Seahorse, flying an American flag, was inside Cuba's claimed 12-mile territorial waters off the southeastern end of the island.
NEWS
April 8, 1989 | GEORGE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Celebrated in song and literature from Shakespeare to Mark Twain, the drunken sailor is a figure as venerable as seafaring itself. In "Moby Dick," Herman Melville inserted a victuals list for a whaling voyage that included "550 ankers of Geneva (gin) and 10,800 barrels of beer" and marveled that harpooners "so fuddled" with drink could "stand up in a boat's head and take good aim of flying whales . . . and hit them, too." But drink and the sea are not mixing as well for modern sailors.
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