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Zapatista Army Of National Liberation

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1995 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tourists gawked, schoolchildren listened attentively and passersby continued about their business Friday as Cecilia Rodriguez made a fervent plea to boost public awareness of a bitter conflict that seemed far away from Olvera Street and the skyscrapers of Downtown Los Angeles. "We have to change people's consciousness," Rodriguez said in her soft voice, seated in front of an image of the ski-masked Mexican rebel leader known as Subcommander Marcos.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1995 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tourists gawked, schoolchildren listened attentively and passersby continued about their business Friday as Cecilia Rodriguez made a fervent plea to boost public awareness of a bitter conflict that seemed far away from Olvera Street and the skyscrapers of Downtown Los Angeles. "We have to change people's consciousness," Rodriguez said in her soft voice, seated in front of an image of the ski-masked Mexican rebel leader known as Subcommander Marcos.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1997 | JANA J. MONJI
In a city plagued with violence, where the police are outgunned by bank robbers and school principals are more concerned with gun control than winning football games, it is chilling to hear a call to arms to liberate the downtrodden. It is even more so when surrounded by high school students attending the Saturday night show. In Mario Zapien's "Zapatistas," playing at the Nosotros Theatre, Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. and their successful nonviolence campaigns are forgotten.
NEWS
January 2, 1994 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of armed Indian peasants attacked four cities and towns in the southeastern state of Chiapas on Saturday. At least three police officers were killed and 18 were wounded, news reports said. The privately owned Televisa network said the rebels, who called themselves members of the Zapatista Army of National Liberation, unleashed the attacks a few hours after midnight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1999 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Rosario Ibarra, one of Mexico's most prominent human rights activists, the struggle for a better life among indigenous people in her country knows no boundaries. On Saturday, the fiery 71-year-old former member of the Mexican Senate spoke at Loyola Law School, urging support of a plebiscite in her country sponsored by the Zapatista Army of National Liberation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1995
Mexico's President Ernesto Zedillo took a risky, but probably necessary, gamble in moving from negotiation to confrontation with the rebel Zapatista Army of National Liberation in Chiapas.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH and MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A police officer and six alleged Zapatista rebels were killed Wednesday in the bloodiest fighting between security forces and rebels in the southern state of Chiapas since a Mexican army offensive there in February 1995. The violence broke out three days after Bishop Samuel Ruiz, the main mediator in the Chiapas conflict, resigned in protest over what he called government intransigence in the stalled peace negotiations.
NEWS
May 1, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Zapatista rebels broke off contact with the Mexican government Monday, saying Congress had "closed the door to dialogue and peace" by watering down Indian-rights legislation. The decision, announced by leader Subcommander Marcos in an angry statement from his jungle stronghold in Chiapas state, threw into jeopardy five months of delicate maneuvering to resume peace talks and could lead to a dangerous stalemate between the rebels and the government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1996 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a political scientist and writer in Mexico City. His latest book is "The Mexican Shock" (New Press, 1996)
So now Mexico has another armed uprising on its hands, or thus it seems. A group calling itself the Popular Revolutionary Army (EPR, by its initials in Spanish) paraded up and down at a memorial in Aguas Blancas, Guerrero, last Friday to commemorate the massacre of 17 peasants by the police last year. Somewhere between 70 and 100 masked men descended on the gathering carrying automatic assault weapons, wearing neat and clean military-style uniforms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1995 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosario Ibarra once seemed destined to live the tranquil existence of a well-to-do Mexican housewife, a doctor's spouse and mother of four in the relatively prosperous northern city of Monterrey. That all changed in 1975, when, during a period of brutal Mexican government repression targeting suspected leftists, security forces arrested her son and he "disappeared."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1995 | From Religion News Service
Encouraged by what he called "signs of hope," Roman Catholic Bishop Samuel Ruiz called off his 15-day fast this week after the Mexican government agreed to negotiate with the rebel Zapatista Army that is waging war in the Mexican state of Chiapas. The peasant uprising began a year ago--on New Year's Day, 1994--when the rebel Zapatista Army of National Liberation declared war on the Mexican government, seeking political revolution, land reform and broader human rights.
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