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Zapatista National Liberation Army

NEWS
February 3, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Department officials acknowledged on Wednesday that "some human rights abuses may have occurred" after last month's peasant uprising in Mexico, but they asserted that President Carlos Salinas de Gortari responded in "a forthcoming and responsible way." In the Clinton Administration's first public testimony on the insurrection in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas, officials said they had been assured that those found guilty of abuses will be punished.
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NEWS
April 28, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along one edge of the square negotiating table sat ski-masked Maya Indians, half of them in ceremonial regalia of woolen tunics and beribboned straw hats. Facing them across the room were highly trained Mexican technocrats, among them Marco Antonio Bernal, a veteran of government social programs, and prominent diplomat Gustavo Iruegas, experienced in finding common ground for different views.
NEWS
September 4, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid official disclosures that Mexico's new ultra-leftist rebels are "urban terrorists" who may have financed an arsenal of modern assault weapons with tens of millions of dollars from a kidnapping ransom, the Mexican government wrestled Tuesday with a new setback in its effort to bring peace to the impoverished countryside.
NEWS
April 24, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebel negotiators reacted angrily Sunday to a government proposal that easing of tensions in the troubled southern state of Chiapas consist of gathering armed guerrillas into three camps. But they agreed to present the idea to their supporters. The government plan contrasted sharply with a detailed, 20-point rebel proposal. "We feel that the government delegates want to talk not about peace, but about surrender," Commander Tacho, coordinator of the ski-masked rebel delegation, told reporters.
NEWS
April 22, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clearing the way for the start of peace talks between the government and the Zapatista National Liberation Army, hundreds of rebel supporters left the negotiation site Friday night, driven away by a severe thunderstorm and the pleas of their leaders. After the village center was cleared, eight ski-masked rebel delegates to the talks told an open-air news conference that they had asked community coordinators to take their townspeople home.
NEWS
May 17, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, the opposition standard-bearer, has become the first Mexican presidential candidate to meet with leaders of the Chiapas Indian uprising on their own turf--a decision that supporters acknowledged Monday was risky for his already flagging campaign. In this town at the edge of guerrilla-held territory, Cardenas stood on an open-air platform Sunday afternoon with the armed, masked leaders of the Zapatista National Liberation Army.
NEWS
March 25, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Subcommander Marcos, in an interview published Saturday, said the Zapatistas are ready to give up their military character in favor of the political process. "The movement has no future if its future is military," Marcos told Nobel Prize-winning author Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Colombian editor Roberto Pombo of Cambio magazine. "If the [Zapatista National Liberation Army] remains as an armed military structure, it will fail.
NEWS
September 12, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mexican government and rebel negotiators took a critical first step Monday toward settling the simmering conflict in the state of Chiapas, signing their first formal agreement since the two sides sat down together in April.
NEWS
January 2, 1995 | JOEL SIMON and MARK FINEMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The music was off-key, the dancing and military maneuvers out of step, but the rhetoric was angry and stern as the Indian rebels celebrated the first anniversary of their New Year's Day uprising early Sunday with a midnight fiesta in the jungle and a call for a national struggle to drive Mexico's ruling party from power.
NEWS
January 12, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Carlos Salinas de Gortari's government, struggling to put down a deadly Indian rebellion in southern Mexico, stepped up peace efforts Tuesday with a call for a truce and an offer to listen to the guerrillas' demands.
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