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WORLD
May 6, 2009 | Mark Magnier
Laborer Amir Zada kicked the flies off his sandals, looked around at the rows of tents and relived the nightmare he had just endured. How the Taliban came and said there would be peace. How the army arrived with helicopter gunships to attack the Taliban. And how the two sides started firing at each other, with civilians like him caught in the middle.
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WORLD
August 16, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said Sunday that the floods ravaging Pakistan are the worst disaster he has witnessed, and urged the international community to speed up delivery of food, medicine and shelter to millions of people — many of whom have yet to receive anything. The Pakistani government and international relief organizations have been overwhelmed by the scale of the disaster, which has killed more than 1,600 people and damaged or destroyed more than 722,000 houses from the country's mountainous northwest to its central agricultural heartland and the flatlands of Sindh province in the south.
WORLD
May 27, 2011 | By Paul Richter, David S. Cloud and Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
Pakistani officials angered by the secret U.S. raid that killed Osama bin Laden declared they would conduct a full review of operations by U.S. drone aircraft over the country and rebuffed an appeal by visiting U.S. officials not to close military intelligence liaison centers, U.S. and Pakistani officials said. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton visited Islamabad on Friday in a bid to ease the mistrust deepened by the secret May 2 raid that killed the Al Qaeda chief. Pakistani leaders see the raid as a blatant violation of their country's sovereignty, and Washington's decision to not inform Islamabad in advance as an example of a glaring lack of trust.
WORLD
March 4, 2009 | Mark Magnier and Aoun sahi
A deadly gun and grenade attack on the Sri Lankan cricket team Tuesday, staged in broad daylight on a busy street in Lahore, delivered a powerful blow to Pakistan's national pride and threatened to further undermine the fragile political stability of a nation under increasing pressure from the United States to crack down on terrorism. The assault left eight people dead, six of them policemen, and half a dozen Sri Lankan players, a coach and an umpire injured.
WORLD
December 14, 2009 | By Greg Miller and Julian E. Barnes
Senior U.S. officials are pushing to expand CIA drone strikes beyond Pakistan's tribal region and into a major city in an attempt to pressure the Pakistani government to pursue Taliban leaders based in Quetta. The proposal has opened a contentious new front in the clandestine war. The prospect of Predator aircraft strikes in Quetta, a sprawling city, signals a new U.S. resolve to decapitate the Taliban. But it also risks rupturing Washington's relationship with Islamabad. The concern has created tension among Obama administration officials over whether unmanned aircraft strikes in a city of 850,000 are a realistic option.
WORLD
October 16, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari won help from ally China as his nation grapples with an ailing economy and chronic electricity shortages. Zardari and Chinese President Hu Jintao signed 11 deals in Beijing, including on economic and technical cooperation, environmental protection, agricultural research, and electricity. There was no mention of a civilian nuclear deal. Pakistani media have speculated that Zardari would seek a nuclear power deal with China after rival India secured such a pact with the U.S.
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Asif Ali Zardari, the jailed husband of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, was elected to the Senate by legislators in southern Sindh province. Bhutto's government was dismissed on charges of corruption and economic mismanagement. She has denied the charges. Zardari, former investment minister in Bhutto's government, was arrested in November, hours after the sacking of his wife's government.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The husband of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto was acquitted of charges that he used political influence to pressure a state bank into granting a huge loan, without sufficient collateral, court officials in Karachi said. The Sindh High Court dismissed the case against Asif Ali Zardari and said it will release its explanation later. Zardari, 39, still faces trial on other charges.
NEWS
February 7, 1993 | Times Wire Services
A Pakistan anti-terrorist court Saturday freed Asif Ali Zardari, husband of opposition leader Benazir Bhutto, after more than two years in jail without a conviction. "It is the people's victory," a delighted Zardari said in an interview. "It shows the cases against me were cooked up. There is no truth in the charges."
WORLD
May 13, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes and Greg Miller
The U.S. military has launched a program of armed Predator drone missions against militants in Pakistan that for the first time gives Pakistani officers significant control over routes, targets and decisions to fire weapons, U.S. officials said. The joint effort is aimed at getting the government in Islamabad, which has bitterly protested Predator strikes, more directly engaged in one of the most successful elements of the battle against Islamist insurgents.
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