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Zarya Space Station

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NEWS
November 26, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
After a flawless launch, the first piece of the International Space Station has developed three minor problems, Russia's top space official acknowledged. But he said the glitches would not affect operations. Neither Russia nor NASA, which is leading the $40-billion space station project, had reported any problems since the Russian-built Zarya, or Dawn, module entered orbit Friday. Now one of Zarya's eight batteries is failing, and an antenna isn't working properly.
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NEWS
December 12, 1998 | From Associated Press
After only a day on board, Endeavour's astronauts turned off the lights and closed the doors of the new international space station Friday for its release this weekend from the shuttle. Among the items left behind for the first permanent residents, due in little more than a year: wrenches, screwdrivers, drills, a spare computer, a video-conferencing system and clothes. There also was a surprise or two, but the astronauts wouldn't say what.
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NEWS
December 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
Two spacewalking astronauts successfully hooked up 40 electrical connections between the first two pieces of the international space station on Monday, allowing power and data to flow from one side to the other. To NASA's surprise, the critical wiring job took less time than expected. Jerry Ross, NASA's most experienced spacewalker, deftly snapped the connectors together as James Newman handed him the attached cables. They were impressed with the seven-story station towering above them.
NEWS
December 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
Two astronauts ventured out on another spacewalk Wednesday and attached antennas to the international space station under construction nearly 250 miles above Earth. In a tense and meticulously planned operation, they also pried open a stuck antenna on Zarya, the Russian-built side of the space station. All it took was several pokes with a 10-foot pole and the 4-foot strip antenna shot out. "There it goes! It's gone!" spacewalker Jerry Ross shouted. "You got it deployed.
NEWS
December 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
Two astronauts ventured out on another spacewalk Wednesday and attached antennas to the international space station under construction nearly 250 miles above Earth. In a tense and meticulously planned operation, they also pried open a stuck antenna on Zarya, the Russian-built side of the space station. All it took was several pokes with a 10-foot pole and the 4-foot strip antenna shot out. "There it goes! It's gone!" spacewalker Jerry Ross shouted. "You got it deployed.
NEWS
November 22, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian space officials gave the first module of the international space station a routine tweak to push it into higher orbit and convened a meeting on Earth to map out its future. Flight controllers fired one of the module's two maneuvering engines to raise it to an orbit about 157 miles in space, the station's public affairs office said. Russian Space Agency Director Yuri N. Koptev said the maneuver was carried out "with great accuracy."
NEWS
December 12, 1998 | From Associated Press
After only a day on board, Endeavour's astronauts turned off the lights and closed the doors of the new international space station Friday for its release this weekend from the shuttle. Among the items left behind for the first permanent residents, due in little more than a year: wrenches, screwdrivers, drills, a spare computer, a video-conferencing system and clothes. There also was a surprise or two, but the astronauts wouldn't say what.
NEWS
November 21, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Zarya, a high-tech space tugboat and control module, rose into the sky Friday from the wind-swept steppe of Central Asia, becoming the first segment of a new International Space Station to be launched into orbit. With a burst of flame and a thunderous explosion, the unmanned, $300-million unit successfully reached orbit atop a Russian-made Proton rocket 14 years after NASA began drawing up plans to build a new space station.
NEWS
December 5, 1998 | From Associated Press
The world's most elite construction crew blazed into orbit Friday aboard space shuttle Endeavour to begin the complex task of assembling the international space station. "Let's go do this," said shuttle commander Robert Cabana, eager to deliver the first American-made piece of the space station after a year's delay and an exasperating, last-minute postponement the day before. "Amen," launch control replied. Endeavour lifted off at 3:35 a.m. with a brilliant white flash.
NEWS
December 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
Two spacewalking astronauts successfully hooked up 40 electrical connections between the first two pieces of the international space station on Monday, allowing power and data to flow from one side to the other. To NASA's surprise, the critical wiring job took less time than expected. Jerry Ross, NASA's most experienced spacewalker, deftly snapped the connectors together as James Newman handed him the attached cables. They were impressed with the seven-story station towering above them.
NEWS
November 26, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
After a flawless launch, the first piece of the International Space Station has developed three minor problems, Russia's top space official acknowledged. But he said the glitches would not affect operations. Neither Russia nor NASA, which is leading the $40-billion space station project, had reported any problems since the Russian-built Zarya, or Dawn, module entered orbit Friday. Now one of Zarya's eight batteries is failing, and an antenna isn't working properly.
NEWS
November 22, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian space officials gave the first module of the international space station a routine tweak to push it into higher orbit and convened a meeting on Earth to map out its future. Flight controllers fired one of the module's two maneuvering engines to raise it to an orbit about 157 miles in space, the station's public affairs office said. Russian Space Agency Director Yuri N. Koptev said the maneuver was carried out "with great accuracy."
NEWS
November 21, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Zarya, a high-tech space tugboat and control module, rose into the sky Friday from the wind-swept steppe of Central Asia, becoming the first segment of a new International Space Station to be launched into orbit. With a burst of flame and a thunderous explosion, the unmanned, $300-million unit successfully reached orbit atop a Russian-made Proton rocket 14 years after NASA began drawing up plans to build a new space station.
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