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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2011 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At the 1994 Cannes Film Festival, fans of Krzysztof Kieslowski found their hearts lifted. And then broken. The Polish master was on the Riviera with the magnificent "Red," the final panel in his "Three Colors" triptych and a film widely expected to receive the Palme d'Or, even by Quentin Tarantino, whose "Pulp Fiction" took the honors instead. But for devotees it wasn't the disappointment of laurels denied that was hard to bear; it was Kieslowski's announcement that he was retiring from filmmaking.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2011 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At the 1994 Cannes Film Festival, fans of Krzysztof Kieslowski found their hearts lifted. And then broken. The Polish master was on the Riviera with the magnificent "Red," the final panel in his "Three Colors" triptych and a film widely expected to receive the Palme d'Or, even by Quentin Tarantino, whose "Pulp Fiction" took the honors instead. But for devotees it wasn't the disappointment of laurels denied that was hard to bear; it was Kieslowski's announcement that he was retiring from filmmaking.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hans Petter Moland's compelling "Aberdeen" stars Lena Headey as an ambitious young attorney whose life unexpectedly starts unraveling at the very moment she has received an important promotion from her large London firm. Her mother, Helen (Charlotte Rampling), who lives in Aberdeen, Scotland, and to whom Kaisa is not close, has asked her to travel to Norway and bring back her father, Tomas (Stellan Skarsgard).
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As in the monumental "The Decalogue," in which Polish director Krzysztof Kieslowski probed the relevance of the Ten Commandments in modern life, Kieslowski has been considering the contemporary meaning of the French Revolution slogan "Liberty, Equality and Fraternity" in his provocative ongoing "Three Colors" trilogy, which began with "Blue."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1994 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Except for his imposing name, there is little about Polish filmmaker Krzysztof Kieslowski that fits the conventional American image of a great director. His public statements are spare, his subject matter intimate rather than epic, and his interest in anything as flamboyant as a cult of personality is nonexistent.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Olivier Olivier" has no trouble with what most films find difficult but stumbles over what should be easy. The result is an emotionally powerful piece of work that is unsatisfactory in terms of simple plot logic, a compelling picture marred by a clumsily built frame. Like writer-director Agnieszka Holland's previous film, the stranger than fiction "Europa Europa," "Olivier" (selected theaters) is based on a true story, in this case one that Holland read in a Parisian newspaper in 1984.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It is a mark of the virtuosity with which director Krzysztof Kieslowski has made "Blue" that it is possible to envision its intensely emotional story of a woman's search for meaning after tragedy unhinges her life becoming, with slight tinkering, the plot for a standard-issue Bette Davis "women's picture" of the 1940s. Yet there is nothing ordinary or banal about the way Kieslowski, a Polish director now working in France, has gone about his business here.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Saying so much as a discouraging word about "The Secret Garden" (citywide) feels unforgivably churlish. For this is that rare thing, an accomplished G-rated film, made by a respected director with fair fidelity from one of the great favorites of childhood literature. So why does the urge to scrawl graffiti all over its pristine surface seem so irresistible?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Fairy Tale--A True Story" is an enchanting, gorgeous-looking movie recalling "The Little Princess" and "The Secret Garden" that, like them, involves a spunky little heroine on her own coping in a new environment. It is even set in the same early 20th century era as the two earlier pictures. It's 1917 and World War I is raging. In the audience at London's Duke of York Theater is 10-year-old Frances Griffiths (Elizabeth Earl), riveted by the sight of Peter Pan flying across the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Dreaming of Joseph Lees" paints a portrait of a young woman who must at last assert herself if she is to have any hope of happiness. The beauty of this English picture is that until its very last seconds we don't know if she will or not, for her story could just as credibly go either way. However, by then we've long since become caught up in her psychological struggle.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"The Beautiful Country" is a grueling epic about a young man (Damien Nguyen), born of a Vietnamese woman and an American soldier, who becomes determined to make his way to America and locate his father in Texas.
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