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Zebra

ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2005 | Susan King
Steve Martin Wild animal trainer Current project: The family film "Racing Stripes," about a plucky zebra (voiced by Frankie Muniz) that becomes a racehorse. (Hayden Panettiere and Bruce Greenwood are the two-legged stars.) Challenge: Training a group of wild zebras to play the zebra called Stripes. Credits: The 1960s TV series "Daktari," "Dances With Wolves," "The Bear." "We have an exotic animal ranch here in California, Working Wildlife.
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BUSINESS
December 24, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blaming declining interest rates, Walt Disney Co. announced Monday that it has withdrawn plans for an innovative--and controversial--bond offering tied to the performance of its television shows. The Burbank-based company had hoped to raise $220 million for TV production from the $420-million offering of 15-year zero coupon bonds knows as ZEBRAS. The offering had a guaranteed yield of 4% but held the promise of up to a 20% return if Disney shows were sold into syndication.
NEWS
August 30, 1998 | PAUL HARRIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cresting a rise on the bumpy game park road, the Land Rover momentarily startled a herd of seven odd-looking zebras. "There they are! Wonderful, wonderful!" exclaimed park ranger Theresa Huber, cutting the engine so as not to scare off the skittish creatures munching on grass and leaves in the semi-desert Karoo National Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2005 | Kevin Crust and Casey Dolan
Comedy Are We There Yet? Ice Cube on a road trip. Sony: $28.95, May 24. Back Roads. Tommy Lee Jones and Sally Field star as a drifter and a hooker. Paramount: N/A, May 3. Bear Cub. Gay Spanish man bonds with nephew. TLA Releasing: $24.99. May 10. Be Cool. John Travolta returns as Chili Palmer in the sequel to "Get Shorty." MGM: $27.98, June 7. The Boys and Girl From County Clare. Liverpool band challenges for All-Irish music championship in 1970. With Colm Meaney. First Look: $24.98, July 12.
MAGAZINE
March 2, 2003 | Richard A. Serrano is a Times staff writer. He last wrote for the magazine about U.S. government mistreatment of mothers of black servicemen killed in World War I.
Finally released after spending half of his life in prison, and still he had to wait. So Christopher Boyce hung around the prison parking lot, rubbernecking, taking in the fresh air around Sheridan, Ore., unsure what to make of freedom. A half hour went by before the big Suburban at last came lumbering up the driveway, carrying his father, a former FBI agent, and his mother, once a Catholic nun.
NEWS
August 27, 2006 | Doug Alden, Associated Press Writer
Raising zebras isn't as simple as black and white. The striped equines are wild animals at heart, leaving only a few patient and experienced breeders in the U.S. "Not everybody in town has one. Everybody in town should have one," breeder Duane Gilbert says with a grin. "They're neat." They're also quite temperamental, so maybe everybody isn't ready for one.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | TAMMY WEBBER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A primary source of food for young fish is quickly disappearing from the Great Lakes, according to scientists who fear it could jeopardize decades of progress in restoring fish populations. Diporeia, half-inch-long shrimp-like crustaceans, have vanished from Lake Erie and are declining at alarming rates in lakes Michigan, Ontario and Huron--a phenomenon scientists suspect is linked to zebra mussels, a Black Sea native that arrived in this country in the late 1980s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1990 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court jury in Los Angeles was asked to decide Wednesday whether a South African safari tour leader illegally imported nine skins from a rare and threatened species of zebra and tried to peddle them in Orange County. The prosecution contends that Wallace Charles Venter, 37, knew it was illegal to sell the Hartmann's Mountain Zebra skins in the United States and had written a letter to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service saying that the skins were not intended for sale.
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