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Zelaya

WORLD
August 23, 2009 | FROM TIMES WIRE REPORTS
The Supreme Court says ousted President Manuel Zelaya will face trial if he returns to Honduras. Zelaya's return to Honduras under a national unity government is a key provision in a plan by a mediator, Costa Rican President Oscar Arias. Soldiers arrested Zelaya June 28 and flew him into exile in Costa Rica after he ignored a court order to cancel a referendum asking Hondurans if they wanted a special assembly to rewrite the constitution. The Supreme Court said Zelaya must keep in mind that charges of treason and abuse of power are pending against him.
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WORLD
September 23, 2009 | Ken Ellingwood and Alex Renderos
Honduran forces toting batons and tear gas today dispersed supporters of deposed President Manuel Zelaya, as he holed up for a second day in an embassy in that nation's capital, Tegucigalpa. Tegucigalpa was largely shut down and its airport closed amid a continuing curfew imposed Monday by the interim government after Zelaya slipped back into Honduras and took shelter at the Brazilian embassy. There were no immediate reports of injuries after helmeted Honduran troops surrounded the embassy and fired tear gas in order to scatter pro-Zelaya demonstrators.
WORLD
November 7, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
Honduran President Manuel Zelaya, ousted in a military-backed coup four months ago, said today that a U.S.-brokered deal to end his nation's political crisis has collapsed. Zelaya pronounced the week-old agreement a "dead letter" after de facto rulers formed a new "reconciliation government" without Zelaya's participation, as the deal had required. "The accord is a dead letter," Zelaya said on a Honduran radio station. "There is no sense in continuing to fool the Honduran people."
WORLD
October 31, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson and Paul Richter
After months of resistance, the de facto government of Honduras relented today and agreed to a deal to restore deposed President Manuel Zelaya to power. "This is a triumph for Honduran democracy," Zelaya, ousted in a military-backed coup on June 28, said from the Brazilian Embassy in the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa. Zelaya was deported in the coup but sneaked back into the country on Sept. 21 and took refuge in the diplomatic mission. The breakthrough came when the coup-installed government succumbed to U.S. pressure.
WORLD
January 28, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood and Alex Renderos
As a new Honduran president took office Wednesday, former leader Manuel Zelaya flew into exile in the Dominican Republic under a deal that ends months of turmoil since his ouster by the military last summer. Zelaya, accompanied by his wife, two children and President Leonel Fernandez of the Dominican Republic, left Honduras just hours after Porfirio Lobo was sworn in as president. Under an arrangement brokered last week by Fernandez, Zelaya agreed to abandon the Brazilian Embassy in Tegucigalpa, the Honduran capital, where he had holed up in September, and to leave the country once his term officially ended.
WORLD
December 11, 2009 | By Tracy Wilkinson
The de facto government of Honduras withdrew its offer Thursday to deposed President Manuel Zelaya of safe passage out of the country, asserting he could leave only if he renounced his claim to the office. The actions by Honduras' coup-installed rulers threw cold water on efforts to free Zelaya from the Brazilian Embassy, where he took refuge 2 1/2 months ago. "I could be here 10 years," Zelaya told a radio station from inside the embassy in the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa.
WORLD
May 29, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Alex Renderos, Los Angeles Times
Manuel Zelaya, the president of Honduras ousted in a military-led coup nearly two years ago, returned home from exile Saturday, greeted by a large, heated crowd and a nation still bitterly divided by tension and violence. With Zelaya's return, Honduras hopes to end its political and diplomatic isolation and overcome one of the ugliest periods of recent Central American history. Zelaya pledged to immediately reengage in politics and will probably lead a new party. "This is the moment to declare victory for the democratic process in Latin America," Zelaya proclaimed.
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