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Zell Miller

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December 15, 2004 | Elizabeth Jensen
Zell Miller, who is retiring as a U.S. senator at the beginning of 2005, is headed to Fox News Channel as a contributor. A Georgia Democrat, Miller made headlines in September for his fiery keynote speech at the Republican National Convention and a subsequent interview with MSNBC's Chris Matthews, in which the lawmaker, upset with Matthews' aggressive questioning, said he wished he lived in an era when he could challenge someone to a duel.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2004 | Elizabeth Jensen
Zell Miller, who is retiring as a U.S. senator at the beginning of 2005, is headed to Fox News Channel as a contributor. A Georgia Democrat, Miller made headlines in September for his fiery keynote speech at the Republican National Convention and a subsequent interview with MSNBC's Chris Matthews, in which the lawmaker, upset with Matthews' aggressive questioning, said he wished he lived in an era when he could challenge someone to a duel.
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NATIONAL
August 20, 2004 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
Republicans on Thursday announced that a conservative Democrat, Sen. Zell Miller of Georgia, would be the keynote speaker at their party's national convention -- the latest signal of President Bush's effort to woo swing voters in his reelection bid. Miller, who is retiring from his Senate seat, endorsed Bush several months ago and previously had been named as a convention speaker.
NATIONAL
September 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
Former President Carter is accusing fellow Georgia Democrat Zell Miller of "unprecedented disloyalty" because of the senator's speech at the Republican National Convention. In a letter sent over the weekend, Carter called Miller's speech "rabid and mean-spirited."
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Bush searched for Democratic friends in Congress, the spotlight focused mostly on veteran, well-connected leaders such as Sen. John B. Breaux of Louisiana. But Bush suddenly has found a steady ally on the Senate's back benches: Zell Miller (D-Ga.), in office less than a year, has emerged as the president's most outspoken Democratic ally on several contentious issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2004 | Mark Z. Barabak, Times Staff Writer
Zell Miller is telling a tale, a parable about a mountaineer, his new bride and their stubborn mule. The silver-haired senator from Georgia is seated in his office on Capitol Hill, amid small shrines to Mickey Mantle and the U.S. Marine Corps, wearing a charcoal gray suit and shiny black cowboy boots. He has made it his mission lately to torment the Democratic Party, his lifelong political home, and verbally torture John F. Kerry, the party's presumptive presidential nominee.
NATIONAL
September 2, 2004 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
On Wednesday, there were developing stories that cable news normally loves -- a hurricane bearing down on Florida, a hostage situation at a school in Russia, and the bombshell out of Eagle, Colo., that prosecutors in the Kobe Bryant sexual assault case were going to drop their charges. But the 24-hour news networks mostly kept their death grip on the Republican National Convention. This was hours before Vice President Dick Cheney spoke.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Georgia Sen. Zell Miller, the highest profile Democrat to endorse President Bush for re-election, will speak at the Republican National Convention this summer. According to a congressional aide who spoke on condition of anonymity, Miller will give his address on Wednesday night of the four-day convention in New York that begins Aug. 30. Twelve years ago he delivered the keynote address for Bill Clinton at the 1992 Democratic National Convention.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Sen. Zell Miller, a Georgia Democrat who frequently sides with Republicans, said he will not seek reelection in 2004. Miller, 70, was appointed to his seat after Sen. Paul Coverdell died in July 2000, then won it in an election that November. In a statement, Miller said he would not endorse or campaign for a candidate to replace him, and would resign after the November 2004 election to let his successor get a seniority edge.
NEWS
July 20, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Democratic Gov. Zell Miller easily won renomination in a primary election while millionaire Guy Millner was headed for a runoff in a five-way race for the chance to be the state's first GOP governor since Reconstruction. Millner, an Atlanta businessman in his first bid for office, didn't capture the 50% vote total needed to avoid a runoff Aug. 9. He will face former Waycross Mayor John Knox, who pitched his campaign to the party's right wing. In other races, Rep.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2004 | Elizabeth Jensen, Times Staff Writer
Chris Matthews is ready for a rematch. When the MSNBC anchor tangled with Sen. Zell Miller on Wednesday night after the Georgia Democrat's fiery keynote speech to the Republican National Convention, it made for some of the best television of the week. It also turned Miller overnight into a much-in-demand TV guest who can be expected to pop up often on screens in coming weeks.
NATIONAL
September 3, 2004 | Janet Hook, Times Staff Writer
Sen. John McCain, who has pushed for more civility in this year's presidential race, is warning that the biting attack on Sen. John F. Kerry by a fellow Democrat at the Republican National Convention on Wednesday night might harm President Bush's efforts to woo swing voters. McCain (R-Ariz.) said the keynote address by Sen. Zell Miller (D-Ga.) could prove as controversial as a speech by Pat Buchanan at the 1992 GOP convention in Houston.
NATIONAL
September 3, 2004 | Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writer
The people who crowded Manuel's Tavern to watch Sen. Zell Miller deliver the keynote speech at the Republican National Convention behaved less like political activists than jilted lovers. Not content with groaning toward the television, they squeezed whoopee cushions. They shook their fists and sang, "Liar, liar, pants on fire!" They made fun of his rural accent. But behind the beer-fueled gaiety of the "Give Zell Hell" party was a sense of deep injury.
NATIONAL
September 2, 2004 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
On Wednesday, there were developing stories that cable news normally loves -- a hurricane bearing down on Florida, a hostage situation at a school in Russia, and the bombshell out of Eagle, Colo., that prosecutors in the Kobe Bryant sexual assault case were going to drop their charges. But the 24-hour news networks mostly kept their death grip on the Republican National Convention. This was hours before Vice President Dick Cheney spoke.
NATIONAL
September 1, 2004 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
The speech Sen. Zell Miller delivers tonight will be the first time a Democrat has delivered the Republicans' keynote address. It will also be the political swan song for the 72-year-old former governor of Georgia. Miller, an old-fashioned Southern Democrat, was reared in an Appalachian hollow where it was said that a yellow dog could get elected sooner than a Republican. He was a strong supporter of President Clinton and delivered the keynote address at the Democratic convention in 1992.
NATIONAL
August 20, 2004 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
Republicans on Thursday announced that a conservative Democrat, Sen. Zell Miller of Georgia, would be the keynote speaker at their party's national convention -- the latest signal of President Bush's effort to woo swing voters in his reelection bid. Miller, who is retiring from his Senate seat, endorsed Bush several months ago and previously had been named as a convention speaker.
OPINION
July 20, 2004
Re "To GOP, He's Dishonoring His Father," July 19: The Democrats have enlisted Ron Reagan to speak on stem-cell research at their convention, causing Republicans to go into paroxysms of outrage over his repudiation of his father's principles and his consorting with the enemy. But the GOP itself is happily trotting out that renegade Georgia Democrat-in-name-only Zell Miller, whose sole and exclusive purpose for speaking at the Republican convention is to cloak himself in his party affiliation and then trash John Kerry.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2004 | Elizabeth Jensen, Times Staff Writer
Chris Matthews is ready for a rematch. When the MSNBC anchor tangled with Sen. Zell Miller on Wednesday night after the Georgia Democrat's fiery keynote speech to the Republican National Convention, it made for some of the best television of the week. It also turned Miller overnight into a much-in-demand TV guest who can be expected to pop up often on screens in coming weeks.
OPINION
July 20, 2004
Re "To GOP, He's Dishonoring His Father," July 19: The Democrats have enlisted Ron Reagan to speak on stem-cell research at their convention, causing Republicans to go into paroxysms of outrage over his repudiation of his father's principles and his consorting with the enemy. But the GOP itself is happily trotting out that renegade Georgia Democrat-in-name-only Zell Miller, whose sole and exclusive purpose for speaking at the Republican convention is to cloak himself in his party affiliation and then trash John Kerry.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Georgia Sen. Zell Miller, the highest profile Democrat to endorse President Bush for re-election, will speak at the Republican National Convention this summer. According to a congressional aide who spoke on condition of anonymity, Miller will give his address on Wednesday night of the four-day convention in New York that begins Aug. 30. Twelve years ago he delivered the keynote address for Bill Clinton at the 1992 Democratic National Convention.
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