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Zero Tolerance

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OPINION
May 26, 2012
Re "States finding zero tolerance in schools no longer adds up," May 23 One of the reasons that schools favor zero-tolerance policies is that they remove the school from reasoning, critical thinking and individual evaluation. They can just look up the punishment and administer it. Neat and tidy. If a parent questions the punishment, the school can say it's out of its hands. We expect our schools to teach children critical thinking and to interpret what they read using their own individual views.
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NATIONAL
February 3, 2014 | By David Zucchino
Louis DiNatale didn't intend to enter Canada when he and his wife wound up on a bridge from New York state to Ontario province one day in September, misdirected by an unreliable GPS. What began as an American couple's getaway to Vermont quickly turned into a lesson on the stark difference between the U.S. and Canada when it comes to gun laws. DiNatale, whose request to turn around and cross back into the U.S. was denied, then made another mistake. When a border official asked whether he had any weapons, he said no. Then the questions started about guns.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1989
In a critique of proposed zero-tolerance measures in Poway and San Diego, the Los Angeles Times wrote on Sept. 10 ("Anti-Drug Push Needs Restraint") that "we are troubled by the inclusion of drug use or possession in small amounts (without evidence of drug dealing) as one of the grounds for eviction." The Times cited as harsh the circumstances of a teen-ager who "experiments" with illegal drugs, resulting in the eviction of the otherwise unaware family. However, The Times' policy of "small" tolerance is left over from the 1960s.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
In all the commotion about a Miami-area police force's allegedly mindless harassment of workers and patrons of a convenience store, one aspect that may have been overlooked is how the cops' behavior was fostered by a "zero tolerance" program.  You may have heard about this case: as documented by the Miami Herald , the police in this suburb of Miami stopped and questioned one denizen of the convenience store 258 times in four years....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1999 | AGUSTIN GURZA
My father enforced a policy of zero tolerance for bad behavior, especially when he lost his patience. If we were acting up in the back seat of our Plymouth station wagon, Dr. Gurza meted out blind justice from behind the steering wheel.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
In all the commotion about a Miami-area police force's allegedly mindless harassment of workers and patrons of a convenience store, one aspect that may have been overlooked is how the cops' behavior was fostered by a "zero tolerance" program.  You may have heard about this case: as documented by the Miami Herald , the police in this suburb of Miami stopped and questioned one denizen of the convenience store 258 times in four years....
OPINION
December 5, 2001
Minutes after reading "The Taliban's Little White Book Offered Harsh Rules to Live By" (Nov. 30), I read about the 7-year-old boy in Tarzana who was suspended from school for bringing a one-inch plastic toy gun key chain, thanks to the district's zero-tolerance policy (Nov. 30). Afghanistan has shown us what happens when zero tolerance is used to make rules for society. LAUSD, are you paying attention? Kay Rosen Granada Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1999
Re Dana Parsons' column "Tustin Schools' Zero Tolerance Adds Hypocrisy" (Oct. 8): The continuing debate over "zero tolerance" demonstrates the obvious need for clarification. No one seems to have decided on a definition on which all can agree. In the Tustin Unified School District, zero tolerance is confined to the following four specific areas: (1) While on school grounds; (2) while going to or coming from school; (3) during lunch period whether on or off campus; and (4) during or while going to or from a school-sponsored activity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2000
Re " 'Zero Tolerance' Is No Substitute For Judgment," Valley Perspective, Oct. 15. David Crowley has provided a real-life and personal example of why the zero tolerance policies that currently exist in many of our schools need to be ended. Administrators and politicians enact these policies under the guise of taking responsibility for the actions of their students, when in fact they are doing the opposite. These rules do not focus on helping children; instead they only exist so that if a school shooting or bombing were to take place, the administrators could point the finger away from themselves and say, "It can't be our fault; we have a zero tolerance policy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1997
Unlike what UCI doctoral student Mike Males writes in "Orange County Voices," July 13, I am one former school official who supports tough "zero-tolerance" standards on adult drunk drivers. As a Newport-Mesa Unified School District board member in the 1980s, I supported one of the earliest zero-tolerance alcohol and drug standards for students in public schools. That zero-tolerance policy greatly reduced the number of students coming to our classrooms and school activities under the influence.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2013 | By Martin Eichner
Question: My company owns and manages several large rental communities. After very strong encouragement from our local police department, I agreed to establish a "zero tolerance" policy for criminal activity by any of our residents. If a police call to one of our properties results in a police report naming a resident, or if it results in a resident being arrested, that action constitutes the "one and final strike" against the resident. That resident and anyone else living in the same unit will be immediately evicted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
In ground-breaking action, the Los Angeles Unified school board voted Tuesday to ban suspensions of defiant students, directing officials to use alternative disciplinary practices instead. The packed board room erupted in cheers after the 5-2 vote to approve the proposal, which made L.A. Unified the first school district in the state to ban defiance as grounds for suspension. The action comes amid mounting national concern that removing students from school is imperiling their academic achievement and disproportionately harming minority students, particularly African Americans.
SPORTS
October 21, 2012 | By Mike Bresnahan
Jack Nicholson wasn't in his courtside seat. Denzel Washington, Magic Johnson and Dyan Cannon weren't there, either. They missed the good, the bad and the Dwight. Dwight Howard was mostly solid in his Lakers debut, dominant at times and sprinkling in just enough mistakes to remind everybody he went 197 days without playing a game. Howard had 19 points, 12 rebounds, four blocked shots and five turnovers in almost 33 minutes as the Lakers lost to Sacramento, 99-92, in an exhibition game Sunday night at Staples Center.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Still dealing with the aftermath of a hazing scandal involving its prestigious marching band, Florida A&M University has found itself involved in another hazing-related controversy, this time involving the Torque Dance Team. The university received an anonymous report from a parent that the all-female dance group had engaged in off-campus hazing activities over the Labor Day weekend, the school said in a statement. The incident allegedly involved alcohol consumption and running up hills, but the school gave no other details.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Josh Garcia got his first police citation in sixth grade for spray-painting graffiti at his middle school. Then came four more tickets for truancy and violating curfew. The worst was at Roosevelt High in Boyle Heights, where he got caught with brass knuckles and was sentenced to weekend detention in Central Juvenile Hall - a scary experience, he said. By senior year, Garcia had had so many run-ins with the law and fallen so far behind in school that he failed to pass the high school exit exam or earn enough credits to graduate.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
The Transportation Security Administration is firing eight federal air marshals for drinking on the job, and suspending six more for failing to report the incident. The 14 marshals, who work out of the New York field office, were notified Friday and asked to turn in their weapons and credentials, TSA officials said. One probationary employee was terminated immediately. The rest can appeal. Federal air marshals are armed, nonuniformed officers who fly on commercial flights to protect travelers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1996
"Congratulations, bravo, bless you and thank you" to the administrators of zero tolerance at Estancia High School in particular, the Newport-Mesa Unified School District in general and Supt. of Schools Mac Bernd's stand on young people taking responsibility for their actions ("Finding Middle Ground With Zero Tolerance," Nov. 24). The job of enforcing this policy must be totally thankless and extremely difficult at best in this era of permissive parenting. How ironic that the first challenge comes from a Municipal Court judge, of all people.
NEWS
June 8, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON -- President Obama says he has "zero tolerance" for leaks of classified information and that his administration investigates every such instance. He stopped short of saying there is a specific investigation underway into the source of recent news stories about U.S. drone strikes against terrorists and cyber-attacks  on Iran's nuclear program. But Obama said that leaks of classified information about national security matters make life harder for him and put American civilians and military in harm's way, and that his administration tries to make sure that sources of such leaks "suffer consequences" for their actions.
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