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Zetas

WORLD
February 3, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood
A kidnapping attempt in northern Mexico led to a highway car chase and gun battle that left seven gunmen and a federal police officer dead, Mexican authorities said. The federal Public Safety Ministry said two kidnapping victims were freed after the late-Monday shootout with gunmen believed to belong to the drug-trafficking gang known as the Zetas. Federal police in Coahuila state went to a shopping center in the city of Torreon after getting a report that two people had been taken captive.
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WORLD
May 19, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Guatemalan authorities have arrested a man they say is a top leader of the drug gang blamed for last weekend's massacre of 27 farmworkers, President Alvaro Colom said Wednesday. The suspect, Hugo Alvaro Gomez Vasquez, is believed to have taken part in the killings in a northern province known as Peten, Colom said in his daily broadcast from Guatemala City. Colom called Gomez "one of the principal leaders" of the Zetas gang in Guatemala, which has served increasingly as a base for Mexican traffickers skirting a crackdown at home.
WORLD
August 30, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
For the second time in two weeks, the mayor of a Mexican city has been slain by purported drug traffickers, authorities say. Marco Antonio Leal Garcia, the mayor of Hidalgo in the violent border state of Tamaulipas, was shot to death Sunday. His young daughter was wounded in the attack. Tamaulipas, which borders Texas, is the same state where a drug gang is suspected in the massacre last week of 72 migrants and where the battle between rival cartels has left a bloody trail of death, cowed authorities and terrified citizens.
OPINION
July 26, 2013 | By Ricardo Ainslie
Last week, Mexican authorities arrested Miguel Angel Treviño Morales, the leader of the Zetas, Mexico's deadliest and most feared drug cartel. In Mexico, the news was met with relief, although there is also apprehension that his arrest will lead to a convulsion of violence; historically, taking out cartel kingpins has meant power struggles within organized crime groups, schisms that leave many dead in their wake. Treviño Morales, known as Z-40, was apprehended - along with a bodyguard and a third man, reported to be the cartel's accountant - without a shot being fired as he traveled along a back road near Nuevo Laredo and the U.S. border.
WORLD
July 10, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Gunmen targeting a rival drug cartel opened fire in a crowded bar in the northern city of Monterrey, killing at least 20 people and wounding several, authorities said Saturday. The attack occurred late Friday in the Sabino Gordo bar in downtown Monterrey, a prosperous and once-orderly industrial hub that has been buffeted by more than a year of fighting between the Zetas, known as the country's most violent drug gang, and the Gulf cartel. Authorities said most of the dead — four of them women — were bar employees.
NATIONAL
July 21, 2009 | Richard Marosi
Federal authorities announced indictments Monday against the reputed leaders of Mexico's Gulf cartel and its paramilitary force, the Zetas, accusing them of trafficking tons of cocaine and marijuana from South America through the Texas-Mexico border. Three of the men are identified as the "triumvirate" that manages the far-flung enterprise, dividing its territories among themselves.
WORLD
March 22, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
The Mexican drug gangs rapidly infiltrating Central America call El Salvador "El Caminito," the little pathway. Once a bystander in the region's narco-business, this tiny country now finds itself enmeshed in an expanding drug trade, a shift brought on in part by the presence of a new, U.S.-funded highway that provides an overland route for shipping cocaine north. For years, traffickers used speedboats and small submarine-type vessels to move drugs from Colombia to northern Guatemala or Mexico, using water routes to circumvent much of Central America.
WORLD
April 25, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Suitcases started piling up, unclaimed, at the depot where buses crossing northern Tamaulipas state ended their route. That should have been an early clue. Then the bodies started piling up, pulled by forensic workers from two dozen hidden graves in the scruffy brush-covered ravines around the town of San Fernando, 80 miles south of this city that borders Brownsville, Texas. At least 177 corpses have been recovered in the last few weeks, most of them, officials now say, passengers snatched from interstate buses, tortured and slaughtered.
WORLD
December 18, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Five high school students waiting for a bus were killed Wednesday when a pickup truck being chased by Mexican army forces careened out of control and plowed into them in the violent northern border city of Reynosa, authorities said. The pickup's occupants, thought to be likely drug cartel henchmen, escaped, authorities said. The youths ranged in age from 13 to 15. A woman and a 5-year-old girl, waiting in cars nearby, were injured. Hours after the incident, dozens of parents and teachers from local schools blocked a main Reynosa highway to protest.
WORLD
May 13, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Mexican authorities responding to an anonymous tip discovered about 50 mostly mutilated bodies dumped on the side of a highway between Monterrey and the U.S. border, a region where rival gangs are battling for control over a lucrative drug-trafficking corridor. The bodies of at least 43 men and half a dozen women were found Sunday in plastic garbage bags near the town of Cadereyta Jimenez, the location of a large state-run oil refinery, officials in the state prosecutor's office told The Times.
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