Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsZf Friedrichshafen
IN THE NEWS

Zf Friedrichshafen

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 19, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
GM Drops Plan to Sell Division: General Motors Corp. abandoned the sale of its automatic transmission division to a German competitor because the U.S. government said it would create a near monopoly. The decision came two days after the Justice Department filed an antitrust lawsuit to block the $525-million acquisition of GM's Allison Transmission Division by ZF Friedrichshafen. The government alleged that the merger would increase prices and lower services for customers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
AUTOS
April 14, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Two of the biggest rivals in American industry - General Motors Co. and Ford Motor Co. - are again joining together to develop transmissions for their next generation of cars. The automakers said Sunday they will team to create nine-speed and 10-speed transmissions that will be smoother and more fuel efficient than the gearboxes currently in their cars and trucks. "Americans want smooth-shifting transmissions," said Dave Sullivan, manager of product analysis for AutoPacific Inc., an industry consulting firm.
Advertisement
AUTOS
April 14, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Two of the biggest rivals in American industry - General Motors Co. and Ford Motor Co. - are again joining together to develop transmissions for their next generation of cars. The automakers said Sunday they will team to create nine-speed and 10-speed transmissions that will be smoother and more fuel efficient than the gearboxes currently in their cars and trucks. "Americans want smooth-shifting transmissions," said Dave Sullivan, manager of product analysis for AutoPacific Inc., an industry consulting firm.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
GM Drops Plan to Sell Division: General Motors Corp. abandoned the sale of its automatic transmission division to a German competitor because the U.S. government said it would create a near monopoly. The decision came two days after the Justice Department filed an antitrust lawsuit to block the $525-million acquisition of GM's Allison Transmission Division by ZF Friedrichshafen. The government alleged that the merger would increase prices and lower services for customers.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling a new vigilance over competition in technology, the Justice Department filed an antitrust lawsuit Tuesday to block the sale of General Motors Corp.'s automatic transmission division to a German rival. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Wilmington, Del., charges that the proposed merger of GM's Allison Transmission Division with ZF Friedrichshafen would reduce competition, raise prices and lessen technological innovation.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp. on Thursday abandoned the sale of its automatic transmission division to a German competitor because the federal government said it would create a near monopoly. The decision came two days after the U.S. Justice Department filed an antitrust lawsuit to block the $525-million acquisition of GM's Allison Transmission Division by ZF Friedrichshafen. The government alleged that the merger would increase prices and lower services for customers.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
A strike at General Motors Corp.'s crucial Lordstown, Ohio, metal stamping plant forced GM on Friday to shut down two car assembly plants that ran out of parts made by the struck facility, including the one making hot-selling Saturns. Early in the morning, the assembly line was idled at the Saturn plant at Spring Hill, Tenn. The plant doesn't stockpile body parts it receives from Lordstown.
NEWS
January 22, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine a slow, scenic glide through the skies in an aircraft that burns little fuel, barely pollutes, affords a good view for all on board and makes no bothersome noise or vibrations. Sixty years ago, before the advent of the jet engine, the rich did travel in this grand style, aboard the giant "silver cigars" developed by turn-of-the-century German aristocrat and army officer Count Ferdinand Adolf Heinrich von Zeppelin.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|