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Zhou Yongkang

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WORLD
March 4, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - In J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter books, few dare to speak the name of the evil Lord Voldemort. Lately, Chinese politics has had its own "He Who Must Not Be Named" or "You Know Who": the former domestic security czar, Zhou Yongkang. Zhou retired in the fall of 2012 from the Politburo Standing Committee, the highest body in the Communist Party, and rumors soon began to swirl that he was the subject of a corruption inquiry (or some high-stakes political score-settling, depending on one's point of view)
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OPINION
April 4, 2014 | By Timothy Garton Ash
BEIJING - President Xi Jinping is leading an extraordinary political experiment in China. In essence, he is trying to turn his nation into an advanced economy and three-dimensional superpower, drawing on the energies of capitalism, patriotism and Chinese traditions, yet all still under the control of what remains, at its core, a Leninist party-state. He may be a Chinese emperor, but he is also a Leninist emperor. This is the most surprising and important political experiment on Earth.
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WORLD
March 22, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
The aftershocksfrom the sacking last week of a powerful Communist Party secretary are still rattling China, injecting an element of turmoil into a transition the government had hoped would showcase the stability of its political system. State media reported this week that 3,300 party cadres from the security apparatus would be sent to Beijing for ideological retraining. The order was unusual enough, but even more so was the fact that the report omitted mention of internal security czar Zhou Yongkang, who heads the Political and Legislative Affairs Committee that is recalling the cadres.
WORLD
March 4, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - In J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter books, few dare to speak the name of the evil Lord Voldemort. Lately, Chinese politics has had its own "He Who Must Not Be Named" or "You Know Who": the former domestic security czar, Zhou Yongkang. Zhou retired in the fall of 2012 from the Politburo Standing Committee, the highest body in the Communist Party, and rumors soon began to swirl that he was the subject of a corruption inquiry (or some high-stakes political score-settling, depending on one's point of view)
OPINION
April 4, 2014 | By Timothy Garton Ash
BEIJING - President Xi Jinping is leading an extraordinary political experiment in China. In essence, he is trying to turn his nation into an advanced economy and three-dimensional superpower, drawing on the energies of capitalism, patriotism and Chinese traditions, yet all still under the control of what remains, at its core, a Leninist party-state. He may be a Chinese emperor, but he is also a Leninist emperor. This is the most surprising and important political experiment on Earth.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2012 | By David Pierson
China launched an Internet crackdown Friday amid its worst political crisis in decades, shuttering more than a dozen websites, limiting access to the country's largest micro-blog providers and arresting six people for spreading rumors about a coup attempt in Beijing. The measures represent the strongest attempt yet to quash speculation that the nation's top leadership is wracked by infighting after the ouster of Bo Xilai, the controversial Communist Party chief of mega-city Chongqing.
WORLD
February 22, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
With a wary eye on popular uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa, Chinese leaders are calling for new ways to defuse social unrest in what appears to be an ominous harbinger of tighter controls on the Internet and elsewhere. Splashed across the front page of Monday's People's Daily newspaper were highlights of a speech given by President Hu Jintao at a Saturday meeting that included all nine members of the Politburo's standing committee and senior cadres from around the country.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Images of Greek demonstrators rioting over austerity measures and Occupy Wall Street protesters scuffling with police in the U.S. appear to be worrying China's communist leaders. One of China's most senior officials has acknowledged that the souring global economy has the government on edge. According to an official New China News Agency report Saturday, China's top security chief warned provincial officials to brace for unrest if financial conditions continue to deteriorate.
WORLD
May 28, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
LINYI, China - At the turnoff for the sleepy farming village of Dongshigu, a man wearing a straw hat appears to be selling watermelons at a rough-hewn stand. But when an approaching car slows, burly young men dart out from behind the nearby concrete house and rush to head it off. "It's not a real fruit stand. They're pretending to sell watermelons so they can spy on people coming in and out of the village," said a 44-year-old farmer surnamed Sun from a village across the road.
WORLD
April 13, 2005 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
One recent night shortly before midnight, a steady stream of vans ferried people from a parking lot in this southern town to an industrial area two miles away, near the border with Myanmar. After passing through the gate of the complex, the vans stopped in front of a yellow building the size and shape of a small airplane hangar.
WORLD
December 16, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Depending on where your sympathies lie, Chinese President Xi Jinping is either in the midst of an admirable campaign to rid the government of corruption or a cynical purge of his political enemies. The latest casualty is Zhou Yongkang, the feared domestic security czar under the previous government who was formally placed under investigation this month, according to numerous reports in the overseas media. The mottled-complexioned, square-jawed Zhou, 71, has long been the bĂȘte noire of Chinese liberals, blamed for excesses against dissidents and for rampant corruption in the state oil sector, where he was an official earlier in his career.
WORLD
May 28, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
LINYI, China - At the turnoff for the sleepy farming village of Dongshigu, a man wearing a straw hat appears to be selling watermelons at a rough-hewn stand. But when an approaching car slows, burly young men dart out from behind the nearby concrete house and rush to head it off. "It's not a real fruit stand. They're pretending to sell watermelons so they can spy on people coming in and out of the village," said a 44-year-old farmer surnamed Sun from a village across the road.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2012 | By David Pierson
China launched an Internet crackdown Friday amid its worst political crisis in decades, shuttering more than a dozen websites, limiting access to the country's largest micro-blog providers and arresting six people for spreading rumors about a coup attempt in Beijing. The measures represent the strongest attempt yet to quash speculation that the nation's top leadership is wracked by infighting after the ouster of Bo Xilai, the controversial Communist Party chief of mega-city Chongqing.
WORLD
March 22, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
The aftershocksfrom the sacking last week of a powerful Communist Party secretary are still rattling China, injecting an element of turmoil into a transition the government had hoped would showcase the stability of its political system. State media reported this week that 3,300 party cadres from the security apparatus would be sent to Beijing for ideological retraining. The order was unusual enough, but even more so was the fact that the report omitted mention of internal security czar Zhou Yongkang, who heads the Political and Legislative Affairs Committee that is recalling the cadres.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Images of Greek demonstrators rioting over austerity measures and Occupy Wall Street protesters scuffling with police in the U.S. appear to be worrying China's communist leaders. One of China's most senior officials has acknowledged that the souring global economy has the government on edge. According to an official New China News Agency report Saturday, China's top security chief warned provincial officials to brace for unrest if financial conditions continue to deteriorate.
WORLD
February 22, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
With a wary eye on popular uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa, Chinese leaders are calling for new ways to defuse social unrest in what appears to be an ominous harbinger of tighter controls on the Internet and elsewhere. Splashed across the front page of Monday's People's Daily newspaper were highlights of a speech given by President Hu Jintao at a Saturday meeting that included all nine members of the Politburo's standing committee and senior cadres from around the country.
WORLD
December 16, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Depending on where your sympathies lie, Chinese President Xi Jinping is either in the midst of an admirable campaign to rid the government of corruption or a cynical purge of his political enemies. The latest casualty is Zhou Yongkang, the feared domestic security czar under the previous government who was formally placed under investigation this month, according to numerous reports in the overseas media. The mottled-complexioned, square-jawed Zhou, 71, has long been the bĂȘte noire of Chinese liberals, blamed for excesses against dissidents and for rampant corruption in the state oil sector, where he was an official earlier in his career.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 |
China has transferred Land and Resources Minister Zhou Yongkang to the post of Communist Party chief of Sichuan province, state media reported today. Zhou was replaced by Tian Fengshan, governor of Heilongjiang province, the People's Daily said. On Wednesday, the official New China News Agency said in a terse dispatch that Zhou had been "relieved of his duties."
WORLD
April 13, 2005 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
One recent night shortly before midnight, a steady stream of vans ferried people from a parking lot in this southern town to an industrial area two miles away, near the border with Myanmar. After passing through the gate of the complex, the vans stopped in front of a yellow building the size and shape of a small airplane hangar.
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