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July 7, 1989 | From Reuters
China appointed a new ambassador to the United States on Thursday as his predecessor's term of office expired, state television said. Zhu Qizhen, 61, will replace Han Xu, who went to Washington in May, 1985. His appointment was approved by the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress, China's nominal parliament. A vice foreign minister, Zhu is head of the Foreign Ministry's department of American and Oceanian affairs.
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NEWS
July 7, 1989 | From Reuters
China appointed a new ambassador to the United States on Thursday as his predecessor's term of office expired, state television said. Zhu Qizhen, 61, will replace Han Xu, who went to Washington in May, 1985. His appointment was approved by the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress, China's nominal parliament. A vice foreign minister, Zhu is head of the Foreign Ministry's department of American and Oceanian affairs.
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NEWS
April 18, 1991 | Times Staff Writer
Chinese Ambassador Zhu Qizhen protested President Bush's meeting Tuesday night with the Dalai Lama, Administration officials said Wednesday. Zhu "explained the Chinese government's concern about meetings by foreign officials with the Dalai Lama," the exiled spiritual leader of 6 million Tibetan Buddhists, a State Department statement said. At the Tuesday night meeting with Zhu, Undersecretary of State Robert M. Kimmitt, third-ranking official in the State Department, reiterated U.S.
NEWS
April 10, 1985 | Associated Press
Chinese officials said today that Washington has agreed that U.S. warships will not carry nuclear arms when they make their first call at a Chinese port in 36 years. Such an agreement apparently would break a longstanding U.S. policy against disclosing whether any ship is armed with nuclear weapons. A U.S. Embassy official in China would neither confirm nor deny the report.
NEWS
May 18, 1992 | From Reuters
Chinese officials searched the office of an American reporter Sunday, warned her about her activities and said they had arrested one of her sources, said the journalist, Lena Sun of the Washington Post. The officials said they were from the State Security Ministry, in charge of rooting out spies and other threats to national security. They had a search warrant and took personal papers and notebooks from the office safe, Sun said in a written statement.
NEWS
September 23, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For three years, the Bush Administration has had a crucial ally in its effort to maintain its China policy in Congress: Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole, whose home state of Kansas has been enriched by China's large purchases of American wheat. Now, infuriated by a testy showdown with the Chinese ambassador to Washington over Beijing's threat to end purchases of U.S. grain, Dole is warning that he will withdraw his support for unconditional renewal of Beijing's trade benefits.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
Sen. Warren B. Rudman told Chinese leaders Saturday that if China maintains its crackdown on dissent, the U.S. Congress might approve even harsher sanctions on the Communist nation. The New Hampshire Republican said he met with Wan Li, chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress, and Vice Foreign Minister Zhu Qizhen to "make sure Chinese leaders understood clearly the impact of the events of June . . . on the American people."
NEWS
February 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
The government said Monday that it resents the United States having invited a leading dissident to a banquet given by President Bush and regrets that a fuss was made when police barred him from attending. Chinese intellectuals, meanwhile, called the action against Fang Lizhi "stupid," "neolithic" and "unacceptable." Fang, an internationally respected astrophysicist who has criticized Marxism and called for democratic reform in China, was invited to the banquet along with his wife, Li Shuxian.
NEWS
April 11, 1985 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
Chinese officials, tackling a particularly sensitive diplomatic and military issue, said in Peking on Wednesday that the United States has assured them that a U.S. Navy destroyer visiting China will not carry nuclear weapons. Their statement, to a group of reporters from Australia and New Zealand, raised questions about the Reagan Administration's adherence to longstanding U.S. policy to neither confirm nor deny the presence of nuclear weapons aboard U.S. ships.
NEWS
November 3, 1987 | United Press International
China has given assurances that it will use "strict measures" to prevent the diversion of Chinese-made Silkworm missiles to Iran, U.S. Under Secretary of State Michael H. Armacost said today. "Our objective is to put the issue behind us," Armacost told a news conference at the end of a three-day visit to China, during which he held talks with Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Zhu Qizhen and met with Vice Premier Tian Jiyun.
NEWS
June 26, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last month, when the Bush Administration was ready to make public its decision to extend China's most-favored-nation trade benefits, the announcement was suddenly postponed for two days. According to Washington insiders, the reason for the last-minute delay was that White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu wanted to carefully scrutinize the decision, its implications and the wording of President Bush's statement.
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