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SPORTS
September 2, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
PITTSFORD, N.Y. — Fred Jackson's path to the NFL was much like one of his long, serpentine touchdown runs, the ones where he zigzags across the field and beats defenders not with blistering speed but an uncanny feel for changing directions at precisely the right time. That Jackson made it to the Buffalo Bills — and became one of the better running backs in the league — is an inspiring testament to his determination, because a lot of other players would have long since given up. His career didn't route him through Los Angeles, Ann Arbor, Columbus, Baton Rouge or any other big-time college football hub. Jackson went to Coe College — a Division III school in Cedar Rapids, Iowa — wasn't invited to the scouting combine and barely got a sniff from anyone in the NFL. He's now a centerpiece of the Bills, who open the regular season Sunday at the New York Jets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Susan King
Someone once told Kurt Russell that his acting career "looks like it was handled by a drunk driver. " And Russell's reply? "I said I can't deny that," he said, laughing. But the boyishly handsome 63-year-old Russell, whom most baby boomers first saw as Jungle Boy on a 1965 episode of "Gilligan's Island," may be selling himself a bit short. His choices might not fit the straight and narrow, but many of his parts over the years have been memorable. PHOTOS: Behind-the-scenes Classic Hollywood He was a heartthrob star at Disney more than 40 years ago in such films as 1969's "The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"ZigZag" is a small movie with a big impact. It represents an astute directorial debut for screenwriter David S. Goyer, who made his mark with strong action-adventures, often comic-book-inspired, most notably "Blade" and "Blade 2." Although a distinct departure from the thrillers he scripted, "ZigZag" is anchored, as was "Blade 2," in a potent father-son relationship. In the "Blade" films, it was between title character Wesley Snipes and maverick scientist Kris Kristofferson.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Romantic entanglements among young, attractive, progressive urbanites inform so many indie films and TV series that it's a relief to see that springboard so definitively turned on its ear. The result is "The Happy Sad," an engaging look at a pair of New York couples whose love lives intersect, crisscross, circle and backtrack in hip and provocative ways. Marcus (LeRoy McClain) and Aaron (Charlie Barnett of TV's "Chicago Fire") are an African American couple who, after six seemingly solid years together, decide to test an open relationship.
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | ELAINE KENDALL
Failure to Zigzag by Jane Vandenburgh (North Point Press: $16.95; 329 pages) If you saw 14-year-old Charlotte and her mother, Katrinka, at the soda fountain in Montrose, you'd think they were winding up a mother-daughter shopping trip, but if you were within earshot, you'd soon realize that this was no ordinary excursion. Katrinka is loudly insisting she's being pursued by teams of psychiatrists from Camarillo; Charlotte is desperately trying to calm her down. After the first few sentences, it's plain that Katrinka is no delightfully madcap mom but a woman temporarily furloughed from the mental hospital; not madcap but truly mad. From that point on, pleasure in the mordant satire and witty dialogue is edged with guilt and pity for the child who so valiantly attempts to understand and cope.
NEWS
June 29, 2004
My wife Heather and I kayaked a grueling one-way, 17-mile trip along the rugged and scenic Na Pali coast of Kauai. Wind and white-capped waves repeatedly capsized other kayakers in our group, requiring lots of "self-rescue" maneuvers. Huge swells made our kayaks zigzag to where we must have actually paddled nearly 25 miles! We launched at 7:30 a.m. and landed six hours later, while exploring several sea caves, rocky reefs and lava tubes with occasional sea turtles watching us. Bartley D'Alfonso Orange
BUSINESS
December 21, 1985
Don Sorenson, whose vibrant abstractions led to his winning the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Young Talent Purchase Award last year, is dead of pneumonia at 36. He died Dec. 14 in an Encinitas Hospital. A graduate of California State University, Northridge, who exhibited extensively at the Nicholas Wilder and Roy Boyd galleries and at Mount St. Mary's College, Sorenson was known for his interlocking zigzag stripes and whorl patterns, which he formed with masking tape.
MAGAZINE
October 29, 2006 | John McKinney, John McKinney is the author of a dozen books about hiking, including "The Joy of Hiking" and "Los Angeles County: A Day Hiker's Guide."
What's wrong with this trail?" the perspiring young sportsman in the Boston Red Sox baseball cap complains to me as I catch up with him at the one-mile marker on Echo Mountain Trail, which ascends the steep slopes of the San Gabriel Mountains above Altadena. "It doesn't seem to be leading anywhere. And it's got too many of those . . . turning things, those--" "Switchbacks," I offer. "Don't you just hate them?"
BUSINESS
July 22, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An investor's apparent attempt to sell a significant chunk of Alliance Imaging Inc. sent its shares to new lows Tuesday, but stock in the medical technology company nearly regained its value by the close of trading. At one point, shares dropped as low as $3.25--a loss of more than a quarter of its value. The stock was down 25 cents when it closed at $4.25 on the NASDAQ exchange. The company has about 6.4 million shares outstanding.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1987 | COLMAN ANDREWS
It's Zagat time again in old L.A. Town. A new edition (the second) of the Zagat Los Angeles Restaurant Survey is in the works. Questionnaires are being collected even as we speak; restaurants are being ranked numerically by hundreds upon hundreds of amateur (and occasionally professional) restaurant critics throughout the Southland; snide or admiring comments are being salt-and-peppered throughout the Zagat forms. The common diner, at last, is having his or her own say.
OPINION
July 9, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
Who says President Obama isn't a unifier? Last week, this newspaper's Edmund Sanders reported from Cairo "As rival camps of Egyptians protest for and against the toppling of President Mohamed Morsi, there is a rare point of agreement: America is to blame. " Both the Muslim Brotherhood and the coalition arrayed against it believe that the United States is against them. And, amazingly, both sides have a point. Obama supported Hosni Mubarak, our geriatric dictator-client, right up until the moment Mubarak needed us most.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
In addition to that famously steep takeoff from John Wayne Airport, passengers aboard some departing jets in Orange County might be asked to endure multiple turns as pilots take a zigzag course as they lift off over Newport Beach. The zigzag takeoff pattern - meant to reduce jet noise in the beach city - would be a first in the continental U.S. Over the decades, the city has fought and sued in an effort to tame noise from the commercial airport, and flights in and out of John Wayne are now some of the most strictly controlled in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Keeping up with James Franco isn't easy. He can currently be seen in theaters as the Wizard in “Oz the Great and Powerful” and as an outrageously scary-funny rapper-gangster named Alien in “Spring Breakers.” In the last few weeks, Franco has promoted both films while pursuing his wide-ranging outside artistic and academic pursuits.  He released multiple music videos, including one starring the infamous filmmaker and author Kenneth Anger,...
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
In the 15 years since Matt Damon and Ben Affleck won the Academy Award for their "Good Will Hunting" screenplay, Damon has worked with some of Hollywood's best directors, become a humanitarian in Africa and even parodied himself with the help of Kevin Smith and Jimmy Kimmel. What he hasn't done is write another script. Until now. In partnership with John Krasinski of "The Office," Damon, 42, has returned to the blank page, co-writing "Promised Land," a script that he initially intended to direct, about a young comer in the natural gas industry who is selling the controversial practice of "fracking" to homeowners in struggling rural communities.
SPORTS
September 2, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
PITTSFORD, N.Y. — Fred Jackson's path to the NFL was much like one of his long, serpentine touchdown runs, the ones where he zigzags across the field and beats defenders not with blistering speed but an uncanny feel for changing directions at precisely the right time. That Jackson made it to the Buffalo Bills — and became one of the better running backs in the league — is an inspiring testament to his determination, because a lot of other players would have long since given up. His career didn't route him through Los Angeles, Ann Arbor, Columbus, Baton Rouge or any other big-time college football hub. Jackson went to Coe College — a Division III school in Cedar Rapids, Iowa — wasn't invited to the scouting combine and barely got a sniff from anyone in the NFL. He's now a centerpiece of the Bills, who open the regular season Sunday at the New York Jets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
What would you do if seven miles of city streets stretched out before you and there wasn't a car in sight? Hop on your bicycle? Drop into a yoga pose? Samba? Salsa? Sing? These are the sorts of choices Angelenos will have Sunday, when the city boots vehicles from several major thoroughfares and urges its citizens to come out and play. From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., portions of a dozen streets will be closed to car traffic on a zigzagging route that extends from East Hollywood through Westlake and into downtown and Boyle Heights.
SCIENCE
February 12, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Ants living in the tops of trees in the Peruvian rain forest have developed a unique technique to control their fall if dislodged. Even though the insects do not have wings, ants that fall are able to glide back to a tree trunk and grab onto bark, a team headed by ecologist Stephen P. Yanoviak of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston reported this week in the journal Nature.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2009 | Times Wire Services
Stocks finished mixed Wednesday after another session of earnings-driven trading. The Nasdaq composite index rose for the 11th straight session, but the Dow industrials and the Standard & Poor's 500 index slipped. Apple rose 3.5% after the company late Tuesday reported that robust sales of laptops and iPhones pushed its profit and revenue above analysts' estimates. Starbucks surged 18%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2010 | By Steve Harvey, Special to The Times
Driving around Southern California, you never know where you'll find oil. Drilling platforms, for example, can be seen on the Coyote Hills golf course in Fullerton, in the parking lot of Huntington Beach's City Hall and outside Curley's Cafe in Signal Hill. There's even a derrick tucked inside the Beverly Center, near the parking area for Bloomingdale's. But one of the area's most unusual drilling sites is just a memory now. It was a well that stood in the middle of La Cienega Boulevard from 1930 to 1946, forcing drivers to zigzag around it. "Pictures and stories about it have been sent all over the globe," The Times noted in 1945.
WORLD
November 22, 2009 | By Megan K. Stack
There's a museum in Budapest called the House of Terror. It has a metal awning with the word "terror" carved out of it, and when the sun is high, the people below step on terror, pass through terror, because the shadow of the word hangs in the air before it hits the ground. Twenty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall signaled the end of Soviet dominance in Hungary, Russia's ghosts linger in a fledgling political system, and its oil and gas muscle spooks the Hungarian government.
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