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April 13, 1987
Zimbabwe, in a challenge to neighboring South Africa, has bought 12 Soviet MIG-29 interceptor aircraft, one of the Soviet Union's most advanced warplanes, for delivery in mid-1988, London's Sunday Telegraph reported. The newspaper quoted unidentified U.S. officials in Washington as saying Prime Minister Robert Mugabe spent his country's remaining foreign exchange reserves--$324 million--and committed future crops to get the warplanes.
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NEWS
March 11, 1989 | From Reuters
Enos Nkala, one of Zimbabwe's most powerful politicians, said Friday that he had offered his resignation as defense minister after lying to a judicial commission investigating black market car deals. "The only action left is that I should quit," he announced in a dramatic finale to two months of public hearings by the commission. His words drew cheers and applause from the public gallery.
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NEWS
March 11, 1989 | From Reuters
Enos Nkala, one of Zimbabwe's most powerful politicians, said Friday that he had offered his resignation as defense minister after lying to a judicial commission investigating black market car deals. "The only action left is that I should quit," he announced in a dramatic finale to two months of public hearings by the commission. His words drew cheers and applause from the public gallery.
NEWS
April 13, 1987
Zimbabwe, in a challenge to neighboring South Africa, has bought 12 Soviet MIG-29 interceptor aircraft, one of the Soviet Union's most advanced warplanes, for delivery in mid-1988, London's Sunday Telegraph reported. The newspaper quoted unidentified U.S. officials in Washington as saying Prime Minister Robert Mugabe spent his country's remaining foreign exchange reserves--$324 million--and committed future crops to get the warplanes.
WORLD
June 9, 2004 | Robyn Dixon and Peta Thornycroft, Special to The Times
Zimbabwe has announced plans to nationalize all privately owned farmland, a move that analysts said could create more food shortages in the southern African nation. After Minister for Land Reform John Nkomo said in the state-run Herald newspaper that all land would be nationalized, some analysts feared the move could further destabilize the nation's agricultural system . "Ultimately all land shall be resettled as state property.
WORLD
October 29, 2008 | Robyn Dixon, Dixon is a Times staff writer.
Comrade Mugabe leans forward, eyes popping behind glinting spectacles. To him it's obvious: The global financial meltdown, coming after endless Western ridicule of Zimbabwe's economy, is no coincidence. It's an act of God. "The world is tumbling, but ours is going on. Doesn't that surprise you?" he says, with a meaningful glance. "What is happening in Wall Street -- what relationship does it have with this little country called Zimbabwe? It's divine intervention. Absolutely."
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