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NEWS
May 31, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Zinka Milanov, the Yugoslavian-born soprano whose voice was considered one of the most consequentially glorious of this century, died Tuesday at Lenox Hills Hospital in New York City. Her biographer, Bruce Burroughs, also a Los Angeles Times contributor, who was in New York attending to details of that book, said she had suffered a stroke Saturday at her apartment overlooking Central Park. She was taken to the hospital where she died at the age of 83. Miss Milanov, who signed her first Metropolitan Opera contract for $75 a week in 1937, became for the next 28 years that company's most prolific "Aida."
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NEWS
May 31, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Zinka Milanov, the Yugoslavian-born soprano whose voice was considered one of the most consequentially glorious of this century, died Tuesday at Lenox Hills Hospital in New York City. Her biographer, Bruce Burroughs, also a Los Angeles Times contributor, who was in New York attending to details of that book, said she had suffered a stroke Saturday at her apartment overlooking Central Park. She was taken to the hospital where she died at the age of 83. Miss Milanov, who signed her first Metropolitan Opera contract for $75 a week in 1937, became for the next 28 years that company's most prolific "Aida."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1988 | WALTER PRICE
"I suppose you want to know about the pianissimo. We might as well get that out of the way at first. I was born with it. I always had it. "Something like that you can't learn." Zinka Milanov is speaking, with that marvelously thick Slavic accent, in her spacious apartment overlooking Central Park. The fabled pianissimo was only one element in a formidable vocal arsenal of the leading dramatic soprano of her time. This species is almost extinct these barren days.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1988 | WALTER PRICE
"I suppose you want to know about the pianissimo. We might as well get that out of the way at first. I was born with it. I always had it. "Something like that you can't learn." Zinka Milanov is speaking, with that marvelously thick Slavic accent, in her spacious apartment overlooking Central Park. The fabled pianissimo was only one element in a formidable vocal arsenal of the leading dramatic soprano of her time. This species is almost extinct these barren days.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1986 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Acclaimed as one of the few genuine dramatic sopranos to enter the international ranks in recent years, Ghena Dimitrova finally gets to the West Coast next Sunday night, courtesy of Ambassador Auditorium, where she appears in recital with pianist Christo Stanischeff. The Bulgarian diva has been a regular in numerous European opera houses for nearly two decades, and has appeared extensively in South America, too.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kurt Baum, one of the world's leading dramatic tenors of the recent past who came to opera from the sports world nearly 50 years ago, has died in a New York City hospital. The Associated Press reported Friday that he had died Wednesday near the comfortable apartment on Central Park South where he had lived in relative seclusion since retiring in 1966.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2003 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Fedora Barbieri, whose big, rich, dramatic mezzo-soprano complemented the voices of such titans as Maria Callas, Jussi Bjorling and Cesare Siepi, died Tuesday in Florence, Italy. She was 82. Her Metropolitan Opera debut in 1950 -- as Eboli in a new production of Verdi's "Don Carlos" on the opening night of Sir Rudolf Bing's regime -- almost didn't take place.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1987 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
Montserrat Caballe was never the sort of artist who could sweep an audience away with temperamental gusto. Nor was she the sort of soprano who lavished much energy on the quest for interpretive profundity. In her best days, however, she could sing like an angel. She commanded a big, luscious lyric soprano notable for its shimmering silver edge, its unmistakable clarity and purity.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1990 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
They take Halloween very seriously in this cultural capital by the bay. On Wednesday night, assorted revelers prowled the streets around the Civic Center in ghoulish drag and goblinesque mufti. Meanwhile, the San Francisco Opera hosted two--count 'em, two--masked balls. The one in front of the proscenium attracted a surprising number of festive folk modeling silly suits and funny hats.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1986 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Acclaimed as one of the few genuine dramatic sopranos to enter the international ranks in recent years, Ghena Dimitrova finally gets to the West Coast next Sunday night, courtesy of Ambassador Auditorium, where she appears in recital with pianist Christo Stanischeff. The Bulgarian diva has been a regular in numerous European opera houses for nearly two decades, and has appeared extensively in South America, too.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1998 | ROBERT GORDON, Robert Gordon is a computer software developer for HBO and an amateur pianist. He originally wrote this as a letter to Peter Hemmings, the director of the L.A. Opera
After giving the matter serious thought, I have renewed my subscription with the L.A. Opera next year. I have become increasingly unhappy with the repertory that it is offering, but I have been a subscriber since the first season and am reluctant to call it quits just yet. The repertory has deteriorated into a steady repetition of the same small number of warhorses, and the commitment L.A. Opera showed in its first few years to covering a broad range of different kinds of opera has disappeared.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1995 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Saturday night at the Orange County Performing Arts Center, Opera Pacific gave the first performance of its latest, reasonably lavish production of "La Traviata." It wasn't an altogether happy experience. The Violetta, Tiziana Fabbricini, confirmed her international reputation for being controversial, to say the least. Her two leading men were strong, but the secondhand staging scheme tended to sag, and the music-making under Steven Mercurio seemed nervous at best, mechanical at worst.
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