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Zola Budd Pieterse

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SPORTS
July 14, 1991 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When word reached Zola Budd Pieterse last Tuesday afternoon that the International Olympic Committee had officially reinstated South Africa, paving the way for its inclusion in the 1992 Barcelona Olympics, she quietly listened and absorbed the news. Because of remarkable change in South Africa and its abolition of remaining apartheid laws, the nation that was once the world's sports pariah was free to return to the international arena.
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SPORTS
July 10, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
The wisp of a woman, whose story we seem incapable of taking beyond a fall on a track 26 years ago, is back in town. In this age of media noise and shallow perceptions, her return could be amped up into a big headline or a teaser to the evening news: "Zola Budd returns to race in Los Angeles." That would be accurate. Its implications would not be. Her name is Zola Budd Pieterse now. She is 44, and moved from her native South Africa to live the last two years in Myrtle Beach, S.C., with her husband and three children.
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SPORTS
August 2, 1992 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
Zola Budd Pieterse is learning, along with her home country of South Africa, about the fickleness of sports fans. She finished ninth in a 3,000-meter heat Friday night, and by Saturday morning the former idol was dismissed in the South African press. "ZOLA DISASTER" read one headline. The stories carried the general sentiment that Pieterse had choked. However, one newspaper offered an explanation for the former world record-holder's poor performance in Barcelona.
SPORTS
August 10, 2009 | BILL DWYRE
Zola Budd has reached the point in her life where she can take her Los Angeles Olympic moment of 25 years ago and swirl it like a nicely aged wine. The memory is smooth now, perfectly palatable. "It's amazing how life works out," she says. She is Zola Budd Pieterse, 43, the wife of a South African businessman and the mother of three. She lives in Myrtle Beach because, she says, when she reached age 40, she decided she wanted to compete in some American Masters Class track events and thought her children's ages, twins Mike and Azelle, 11, and Lisa, 13, were right for such an adventure.
SPORTS
July 10, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
The wisp of a woman, whose story we seem incapable of taking beyond a fall on a track 26 years ago, is back in town. In this age of media noise and shallow perceptions, her return could be amped up into a big headline or a teaser to the evening news: "Zola Budd returns to race in Los Angeles." That would be accurate. Its implications would not be. Her name is Zola Budd Pieterse now. She is 44, and moved from her native South Africa to live the last two years in Myrtle Beach, S.C., with her husband and three children.
SPORTS
August 10, 2009 | BILL DWYRE
Zola Budd has reached the point in her life where she can take her Los Angeles Olympic moment of 25 years ago and swirl it like a nicely aged wine. The memory is smooth now, perfectly palatable. "It's amazing how life works out," she says. She is Zola Budd Pieterse, 43, the wife of a South African businessman and the mother of three. She lives in Myrtle Beach because, she says, when she reached age 40, she decided she wanted to compete in some American Masters Class track events and thought her children's ages, twins Mike and Azelle, 11, and Lisa, 13, were right for such an adventure.
SPORTS
July 8, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Mary Slaney and Zola Budd will race again in London on Friday, eight years after their collision in the 1984 Olympics. In Budd's first British appearance since anti-apartheid demonstrations drove her back to South Africa in 1987, the women will be part of an international field in the 2,000 meters. Slaney, 33, failed to qualify for Barcelona. Budd, 26, will compete for South Africa.
SPORTS
October 16, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Mary Slaney led from start to finish to win a mile road race at Sydney, Australia. She was provisionally timed in 4 minutes 23.15 seconds, with South Africa's Zola Budd-Pieterse second and Australia's Krishna Stanton third.
SPORTS
April 19, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Cheered wildly by 40,000 Senegalese Saturday at Dakar, a South African track team made its first appearance in black Africa since the end of colonization 30 years ago. President F.W. de Klerk's dismantling of apartheid has cleared the way for an end of the international isolation of South Africa, which will send a team to the Summer Olympics.
SPORTS
June 21, 1992 | Associated Press
Distance runners Zola Budd Pieterse and Elana Meyer head the list of South African athletes chosen Saturday to compete at the Summer Olympics in Barcelona. The Games will be the first to include South Africa since 1960 and the first ever to include black South Africans. Most of the 96 athletes chosen are white, however, because for decades under apartheid, whites routinely had superior training opportunities.
SPORTS
August 2, 1992 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
Zola Budd Pieterse is learning, along with her home country of South Africa, about the fickleness of sports fans. She finished ninth in a 3,000-meter heat Friday night, and by Saturday morning the former idol was dismissed in the South African press. "ZOLA DISASTER" read one headline. The stories carried the general sentiment that Pieterse had choked. However, one newspaper offered an explanation for the former world record-holder's poor performance in Barcelona.
SPORTS
July 8, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Mary Slaney and Zola Budd will race again in London on Friday, eight years after their collision in the 1984 Olympics. In Budd's first British appearance since anti-apartheid demonstrations drove her back to South Africa in 1987, the women will be part of an international field in the 2,000 meters. Slaney, 33, failed to qualify for Barcelona. Budd, 26, will compete for South Africa.
SPORTS
July 14, 1991 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When word reached Zola Budd Pieterse last Tuesday afternoon that the International Olympic Committee had officially reinstated South Africa, paving the way for its inclusion in the 1992 Barcelona Olympics, she quietly listened and absorbed the news. Because of remarkable change in South Africa and its abolition of remaining apartheid laws, the nation that was once the world's sports pariah was free to return to the international arena.
SPORTS
April 21, 1992 | ALLAN MALAMUD
The intracity series between the Lakers and Clippers is eight years old, but not until Sunday night at the Forum was a rivalry born. . . . For 53 minutes on the court, it was like USC vs. UCLA in football or the Dodgers vs. the San Francisco Giants. . . . Commentator Hubie Brown, who is a regular on TNT telecasts, said on Channel 13 that the Lakers' 109-108 overtime victory was the best NBA game he has seen all season. . . .
SPORTS
August 7, 1991 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An application by some of South Africa's best athletes to compete in this month's track and field World Championships in Tokyo was rejected Tuesday by International Amateur Athletic Federation officials in London. Jayne Pearce, a spokeswoman for the IAAF, the world governing body for track and field, said in a statement: "We can't accept individual applications." Twenty-eight South Africans, including Zola (Budd) Pieterse and U.S.
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