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NEWS
May 27, 1988 | From Reuters
A zebra in a Yugoslav zoo chose death over captivity and killed herself by smashing her head against the ground. The state news agency Tanjug said Thursday that the zebra broke her spine after keepers foiled an attempt by her and her mate to escape from the Sarajevo zoo.
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NEWS
May 26, 1988 | Reuters
A zebra in a Yugoslav zoo chose death over captivity and killed herself by smashing her head against the ground. Tanjug news agency said today that the zebra broke her spine after keepers foiled an attempt by the animal and her mate to escape from the Sarajevo zoo.
NEWS
March 31, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A 12-year-old boy fell into a cage at a Moscow zoo and was mauled to death by a bear, officials said. The boy went Sunday to a zoo belonging to a youth organization of aspiring biologists. He climbed atop a cage and fell through, police said. The female bear was shot dead by police in a bid to save the child. The child died in a hospital overnight, the Interfax news agency said.
OPINION
November 27, 2006
Re "L.A. Zoo is still undecided on elephant's future," Nov. 22 Why is it that L.A. Zoo Director John Lewis says he wants what's best for Ruby the elephant but keeps her in solitary confinement in a small, inadequate space at the zoo where no one ever sees her? She doesn't even have the company of other elephants, which is vital for her emotional well-being. What's best for this 45-year-old gal is to be able to roam freely on acres of soft, rolling hills at the Performing Animal Welfare Society sanctuary in Northern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1988
I'm not sure your readers fully understand the hazards of working with elephants. As a former 10-year employee of the Erie, Pa., zoo, I can share this knowledge: Elephants have killed more people than any other zoo or circus animal. The elephant is an extremely strong, powerful and dangerous animal who can crush a man against a wall with about as much effort as a human can flatten a fly. If an elephant doesn't respect its handler, the handler is the one who will be beaten and into a more critical state than a light bruising.
NEWS
July 12, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
A century ago, when Brazil was Latin America's only monarchy, a nobleman named Joao Batista Viana de Drummond opened Rio's first zoo. To attract customers, he started a daily raffle with gate prizes. And, in a fitting flourish, the numbers used for the raffle were symbolized by animals: the ostrich, the camel, the elephant, the monkey, the tiger and others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1989 | ANDREW LAM, Andrew Lam is an associate editor with Pacific News Service in San Francisco
The Vietnamese immigrants newly arrived in this country describe a very different Vietnam than the one I remember. In the old Saigon zoo, the monkeys are now so thin that some of them sit between the bars of their cages. The tigers and lions are fed with sewer rats; once in a while, they are fed a stray dog. The parrots talk less, the bears lie in their pits. Vietnam, in a way, has come to resemble its zoo. Stripped of its prowess and mysticism, it is reduced to a pitiful existence.
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