Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsZoos
IN THE NEWS

Zoos

NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
Bao Bao is the name that's been chosen for the female giant panda cub at Washington's National Zoo, following a tally of 123,039 votes. In case you missed it, the name was announced Sunday, giving us all another opportunity to look at pictures of panda cubs. Do it. You'll feel as warm and fuzzy as Bao Bao.  The other choices for names? Ling Hua, Long Yun, Mulan and Zhen Bao. The cub, whose name is pronounced "bough bough," now weighs about 11 1/2 pounds and is roly-poly. But she didn't start out so cute.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - Jenny Chung is looking at the elephant that killed her sister, a well-known veterinarian in New Zealand who devoted years to the elephant's care after she was rescued from a touring circus. Chung has no anger toward Mila, the 7,600-pound African elephant with thoughtful eyes, stubby tusks, and hair on her back that turns reddish from "dirt baths. " "She never meant to hurt Helen, I'm convinced of that," Chung said. "She's lovely and she deserves to live like an elephant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2013 | By Jason Wells
Banana Sam -- the pint-sized squirrel monkey who gained worldwide fame after intruders plucked him from his San Francisco Zoo exhibit -- has died at 19, officials announced Friday. The 2-pound squirrel monkey was 17 years old when he was snatched overnight Dec. 30, 2011, by vandals who cut two holes into the mesh of the squirrel monkey exhibit. The disappearance of the 1-foot tall monkey transfixed San Francisco, especially after someone started a Twitter profile during the rush to track him down.
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Carla Hall
A rare pygmy three-toed sloth stirred an international controversy after officials of the Dallas World Aquarium caught and crated six of the creatures on Isla Escudo de Veraguas, an island off Panama. The aquarium officials intended to take the animals back to Dallas - and made it clear they had extensive paperwork and permits to do so - but were confronted at the Isla Colón International Airport in the Bocas del Toro province of Panama by protesters and police who barred them from leaving the airport with the sloths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
The Los Angeles Zoo this week announced its first birth of a rare okapi -- also known as a forest giraffe. The calf was born Aug. 26 but until now was kept out of public view while it bonded with his mother. Okapis are shy, with velvety fur, zebra-like black and white strips on their legs, and a prehensile tongue that can be as long as 18 inches, according to the zoo. They are the closest living relative to the giraffe and are found in the forests of Central Africa. Adult okapis grow to more than 6 feet tall and weigh between 400 and 700 pounds.
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Lindsay Barnett
Three-month-old Sumatran tiger siblings' swimming skills were tested by staff Wednesday at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C. The cubs, a male named Bandar and a female named Sukacita, both passed what the zoo termed a "swim reliability test" that is conducted on all cubs before they are cleared to appear in the zoo's Great Cats exhibit. The exhibit is surrounded by a moat, so it's important for the cubs' safety that they master basic skills such as keeping their heads above the surface of the water and pulling themselves out of the moat.
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Laura E. Davis
A cub was born to giant panda Mei Xiang on Aug. 23, but she doesn't have a name yet. That's where you come in. The National Zoo wants the public's help in naming the cub. Voters can choose among five Chinese names and submit their choice on the Smithsonian's website. The names are: Bao Bao (precious, treasure); Ling Hua (darling, delicate flower); Long Yun (Long is the Chinese symbol of the dragon, Yun means charming); Mulan (legendary Chinese warrior; remember the Disney movie?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2013 | By Alicia Banks
A record high 21 endangered California condors were treated at the Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens for lead poisoning in October -- more than half what of the center sees in a typical year, officials reported. The zoo's announcement comes just weeks after Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation requiring hunters to use non-lead ammunition in an effort to keep the toxic element from being passed on from carcasses to scavengers, such as condors. Adam Keats, senior counsel and urban wildlands program director for the Center of Biological Diversity, attributed the high quantity of condor poisonings to hunting activity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The Los Angeles Zoo is trying to raise the population of female Komodo dragons, a giant and endangered lizard, by using a DNA test originally devised to identify the gender of bird eggs. Swelling the female ranks would help close a gender gap in captive dragons in North America, which is home to 71 males, 46 females and six of the giant lizards whose sex remains unknown. It would also move the species closer to a self-sustaining and genetically diverse population, which scientists believe they would reach with 75 males and 75 females.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|