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NEWS
August 17, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Zulus and supporters of the African National Congress fought bloody battles in Soweto township for a second day today, and the ANC said sections of state security were promoting the violence. Police smothered the confrontation zones in central areas of Soweto with tear gas to try to prevent fresh clashes on streets where at least 24 people have been killed in two days.
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NEWS
June 19, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On one side are Zulus who say they were unjustly evicted from their land under apartheid. On the other, descendants of a Scotsman who became a white Zulu chief and then the patriarch of a mixed-race family that still controls vast acres of sugar cane. A contentious blend of legal claims, racial privilege and ancestral attachments is threatening to erupt in this fertile coastal region of South Africa.
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NEWS
January 25, 1986 | Associated Press
Tribal fighting left at least 42 people dead in the Durban area and 6,000 to 7,000 others homeless when many residents torched their own homes and fled the battle scene, police said Friday. Durban police Capt. Winston Heunis said the devastated Umbumbulu shanty district, 20 miles southwest of Durban, was quiet Friday after two days of clashes between the Pondo tribe and the larger Zulu tribe. Heunis estimated that 2,000 shacks were destroyed.
NEWS
March 23, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Gunmen killed 11 people, including a woman and her infant, in an overnight attack in volatile KwaZulu-Natal province, police said. The bodies of seven victims were found in a house in Donnybrook, a township 270 miles southeast of Johannesburg in the traditional Zulu homeland. Four other bodies, including an infant who apparently suffocated under the body of its slain mother, were found in different places within half a mile of the house, Police Superintendent Henry Budhram said.
NEWS
October 5, 1987
The death toll from floods in South Africa's Natal province was revised upward to 205, while estimates of the number of people left homeless ranged from 55,000 to as many as 590,000. Health Minister Willem van Niekerk said 118 people are missing after five days of heavy rains and flooding last week.
NEWS
December 30, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The killers came 600 to 1,000 strong, marching for miles over steep hills and down lush valleys, beating cowhide shields and waving traditional Zulu spears and knobbed clubs, as well as modern assault rifles and two-way radios.
NEWS
May 9, 1985 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Eleven blacks were killed and scores more injured here Wednesday when migrant workers, armed with traditional tribal weapons, swept Tsakane in wave upon wave of attacks to avenge the deaths of two colleagues. Forming 200-man impis, the battle unit of the Zulu tribe, and arming themselves with spears, machetes, axes, clubs and makeshift weapons of all sorts, the migrants attacked men, women and even children in fighting that began late Tuesday and lasted most of Wednesday.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | JOY ASCHENBACH, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Africa, which already has more independent countries than any other continent, is in danger of splitting again, with potential untold violence on the chaotic horizon. Will Eritrea be its 53rd nation-state, or western Sahara, southern Sudan or northern Somaliland? Africa's 52 countries--most attained sovereignty from European control in the 1960s--make up about 30% of the world total. Six African countries are perennially among the 10 poorest on Earth, according to the World Bank.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1986 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
Live every day as though it were your last, and one day you'll be right. --Breaker Morant Psychologically speaking, there's no true leisure class in South Africa, where everybody, to one degree or another, is embattled. That may in part account for why virtually all of its serious art and literature has an unadorned, penetrating directness, and an edge of sorrow for all that has happened and all that's about to happen. Everyone knows that time is running out--for many, it already has.
NEWS
March 23, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Gunmen killed 11 people, including a woman and her infant, in an overnight attack in volatile KwaZulu-Natal province, police said. The bodies of seven victims were found in a house in Donnybrook, a township 270 miles southeast of Johannesburg in the traditional Zulu homeland. Four other bodies, including an infant who apparently suffocated under the body of its slain mother, were found in different places within half a mile of the house, Police Superintendent Henry Budhram said.
NEWS
December 30, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The killers came 600 to 1,000 strong, marching for miles over steep hills and down lush valleys, beating cowhide shields and waving traditional Zulu spears and knobbed clubs, as well as modern assault rifles and two-way radios.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1994
Having just returned from South Africa where I met so many fine Zulu people, I took offense to Anthony Hazlitt Heard's accusation of Zulus going "on the rampage laying into civilians" (Commentary, March 30). Following the aforementioned quote, Heard admitted that the Zulus were fired upon from high-rise buildings. Hey, I'd run too if snipers were firing at me. Then Heard evoked the name of God in his next untruth wherein he accused the Zulu demonstrators of attempting to "storm the ANC headquarters."
NEWS
April 6, 1994 | Times Wire Services
Thousands of Zulu nationalists brandishing spears, clubs and sticks marched in this Natal province city Tuesday, defying a state of emergency. Zulu tribal chiefs called for the show of force to protest the deaths of Zulus in political violence and to commemorate those killed following a Zulu march last week in Johannesburg. Police said 85 people have been killed in political violence in the Zulu-dominated province since Thursday, when the state of emergency was declared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1994 | ANTHONY HAZLITT HEARD, Anthony Hazlitt Heard is the former editor of the Cape Times, Cape Town.
How much bloody mayhem can the South African body politic absorb? The answer, based on experience, is: plenty. But there is a limit. That point came dangerously close when the country's major city, Johannesburg, which had been bidding for the Olympic Games in 2004, was closed down on Monday. Zulu demonstrators singing praises to their king went on the rampage, laying into civilians as snipers shot at them from high-rise blocks, while resolute policing was conspicuously absent.
NEWS
March 30, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to reassure a traumatized city and a frightened nation, the head of the independent electoral commission calmly insisted Tuesday that the blazing gun battles and chaos that swept the central business district here Monday will not derail or delay next month's democratic elections. "Quite frankly, it does not seem to impact directly on the prospects of substantially free and fair elections," Judge Johann Kriegler told a news conference. "It may have major political implications . . .
NEWS
March 5, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of threatening to boycott the country's first democratic elections, leaders of a key Zulu nationalist party and an umbrella group of white extremists rushed to register for the April ballot late Friday night, shortly before a final, midnight deadline expired. The Zulu-based Inkatha Freedom Party formally registered but set stiff conditions to run in the historic elections, including use of international mediation to help solve disputes over a broad range of constitutional issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1994
Having just returned from South Africa where I met so many fine Zulu people, I took offense to Anthony Hazlitt Heard's accusation of Zulus going "on the rampage laying into civilians" (Commentary, March 30). Following the aforementioned quote, Heard admitted that the Zulus were fired upon from high-rise buildings. Hey, I'd run too if snipers were firing at me. Then Heard evoked the name of God in his next untruth wherein he accused the Zulu demonstrators of attempting to "storm the ANC headquarters."
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | Reuters
At least 24 people were killed Wednesday when rival Zulu clans battled with guns, axes and spears in South Africa's Natal province, police said.
NEWS
February 17, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to defuse a growing political crisis and reduce the threat of civil war, leaders of the government and the African National Congress on Wednesday announced major political concessions in hopes of luring militant black and white holdouts into the election process. President Frederik W. de Klerk announced that the Parliament will be called into special session in early March to ratify a series of amendments to the recently approved interim constitution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1994
In yet another challenge to democracy in South Africa, the Zulu-based Inkatha Freedom Party plans to boycott the nation's first free multiracial elections. This protest isn't expected to derail the election of Nelson Mandela as the country's next president; he clearly is the favorite of most black South Africans, including some Zulus, and he can also count on limited white support in the April balloting. But Mandela and President Frederik W.
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