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Zuni Indians

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NEWS
August 12, 1991 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Senior bow priest Perry Tsadiasi bends down to embrace the long, brown-bagged bundle lying on the table. Clutching it to his cheek, Tsadiasi whispers a prayer in the gentle, confidential murmur of a parent comforting a lost child. The religious elder takes the bundle in his arms, slowly circles the room while repeating the chant and pauses at the doorway, where an offering of sacred cornmeal has been strewn in his path. The purification rite is complete.
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NEWS
August 12, 1991 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Senior bow priest Perry Tsadiasi bends down to embrace the long, brown-bagged bundle lying on the table. Clutching it to his cheek, Tsadiasi whispers a prayer in the gentle, confidential murmur of a parent comforting a lost child. The religious elder takes the bundle in his arms, slowly circles the room while repeating the chant and pauses at the doorway, where an offering of sacred cornmeal has been strewn in his path. The purification rite is complete.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Washington's Smithsonian Institution has returned two sacred war gods taken from the Zuni Indians in the 1800s. The sacred Ahayu:Da figures were returned during a quiet weekend ceremony. Since 1978, the Zuni Pueblo tribe has sought the return of at least 70 objects. "We mentioned to the museum that we do not care to get everything back that museums carry which were taken off our lands, but just those things that are really important to our people," Zuni Gov. Robert Lewis said.
NEWS
August 16, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON and RONALD J. OSTROW
BURRO NEWS: When the Feds first rounded up "excess" wild burros on public rangelands, they offered the critters for adoption as pets. But then officials learned from Ute and Zuni Indians that burros--while often thought of as stubborn and stupid--are like grizzled junkyard dogs when it comes to keeping coyotes and foxes away from sheep. So now the Bureau of Land Management is besieged by ranchers seeking burros.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe Skeen, the blunt-talking sheep rancher who often irked environmentalists by championing agrarian causes during his 22 years in Congress, died Sunday night after a long battle with Parkinson's disease. He was 76. New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, a Democrat who had served in Congress with -- and often against -- Republican Skeen, called him "a vintage New Mexican." "He loved the land and represented New Mexico's rural lifestyle with great skill," Richardson said.
BOOKS
July 26, 1992 | ALEX RAKSIN
THE BEAUTIFUL AND THE DANGEROUS: Encounters with the Zuni Indians by Barbara Tedlock (Viking: $23; 336 pp.). Look at the Zuni reservation in New Mexico from a dirt roadside and you will see rudimentary shelter on arid land: rusty old trucks parked next to stone houses on rangeland desiccated in the 19th Century by damming and denuded of juniper, sagebrush and pinon in the 20th by land management programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1996 | MICHELLE BOORSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When the rains first stopped, Michael Dalton was not worried. Like Hopi farmers a thousand years before, he would figure a way to rouse life in the thirsty desert soil. Nine months later, Dalton sits in his kitchen and cries. The window frames a parched range that seems yellow forever, interrupted only by patches of brittle scrub and the occasional cattle carcass. The Southwestern drought has hit all farmers hard, leaving many unable to feed their livestock and their families.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1988 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
In Australian aboriginal culture, dreamtime refers to the mythical twilight before creation when man's totemic ancestors roamed the barren land, breathing life into rivers, mountains, animals and, eventually, man. Young men learn these tales at initiation, chanting elaborate song cycles while they construct sand paintings to illustrate the myths. The creation lore has been passed down in this manner for thousands of years.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1992 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When I was in college, I had this great part-time job at a See's Candies store. The pay was nothing to write home about, but, oh, the fringes. From lemon creams to toffee crisps, I taste-tested my way into a blissfully befuddled candyholic haze. Audiences leaving "Cinderella, Cinderella" may find themselves in a similar state.
NEWS
May 19, 2005 | Andy Brumer, Special to The Times
Two years ago, two composers -- one from the United States, the other from Mexico -- met for the first time at the Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach. Their mission: to create an orchestral suite reflecting two cultures and inspired by the museum's permanent collection. The result is "Dos Visiones," which will receive its U.S. premiere by the Long Beach Symphony Orchestra at the Terrace Theater on Saturday.
MAGAZINE
June 9, 1991 | Barry Siegel, Barry Siegel, a Times national correspondent, is the author of "A Death in White Bear Lake" (Bantam )
STANDING IN THE LOBBY OF THE GREER GARSON THEATRE AT THE COLLEGE OF Santa Fe, Evan S. Connell studies the disorderly scene before him with muted consternation. This is not an environment he enjoys. More than 100 people are jammed together in a serpentine line that winds up and down through the lobby, aimed toward a single ticket window. "Is this the end of the line?" a newcomer calls out. "Is there a line?" another peals.
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