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Zyprexa

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BUSINESS
March 12, 2008 | From Reuters
The state of Connecticut sued Eli Lilly & Co. on Tuesday, accusing the drug maker of illegally marketing and concealing serious side effects of its top-selling schizophrenia medicine, Zyprexa. Atty. Gen. Richard Blumenthal is seeking to recover "millions of taxpayer and consumer dollars improperly spent on Zyprexa as a result of its illegal marketing, and millions more spent for treatment of serious side effects from Zyprexa," according to a statement. Indianapolis-based Lilly is in a trial in Alaska that began this month in which the state has made similar claims involving the drug.
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SCIENCE
June 18, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The Food and Drug Administration says it is investigating the unexplained deaths of two patients in the wake of receiving intramuscular injections of the antipsychotic medication Zyprexa (generic name olanzapine). The patients died three to four days after receiving appropriate doses of Zyprexa Relprevv, which is designed to release slowly into the blood over two to four weeks and provide regular dosing for adults with schizophrenia. The FDA says the deaths occurred well after the three-to-four-hour window following injection during which patients should be monitored in a physician's office for a potentially deadly complication called post-injection delirium sedation syndrome (PDSS)
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BUSINESS
July 4, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A federal judge in New York urged Eli Lilly & Co. to settle a multibillion-dollar lawsuit filed by insurers, unions and others who claim the pharmaceutical giant overpriced Zyprexa and exaggerated its usefulness. In a 290-page discussion draft, U.S. District Judge Jack Weinstein said he was prepared to grant class-action status for the lawsuit brought by Mid-West National Life Insurance Co. of Tennessee and others. He set a hearing on the proposed order for July 31. The claims center on alleged overpricing and allegations that the Indianapolis drug maker marketed the anti-psychotic drug for unapproved off-label uses.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2010 | By Christine Dempsey and Shawn Beals
In what officials described Tuesday as a "sophisticated, well-planned" heist, thieves scaled the walls of an Eli Lilly warehouse, cut a hole in the roof, slid down ropes and loaded dozens of pallets holding $75 million worth of prescription drugs onto at least one truck. The thieves also disabled the alarm system at the 70,000-square-foot warehouse, one of three distribution centers in the nation for the international pharmaceutical firm. The robbery took place sometime early Sunday but was not discovered until later in the day, when an employee showed up for work, authorities said.
HEALTH
December 4, 2000 | Denise Hamilton
For the almost 3 million people in the United States diagnosed with manic depression, the announcement earlier this year that the federal Food and Drug Administration had approved a new drug to treat their illness brought cautious optimism. Health spoke to Dr. Stephen G. Hayes, president-elect of the Southern California Psychiatric Society, the local branch of the American Psychiatric Assn.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2010 | By Christine Dempsey and Shawn Beals
In what officials described Tuesday as a "sophisticated, well-planned" heist, thieves scaled the walls of an Eli Lilly warehouse, cut a hole in the roof, slid down ropes and loaded dozens of pallets holding $75 million worth of prescription drugs onto at least one truck. The thieves also disabled the alarm system at the 70,000-square-foot warehouse, one of three distribution centers in the nation for the international pharmaceutical firm. The robbery took place sometime early Sunday but was not discovered until later in the day, when an employee showed up for work, authorities said.
HEALTH
September 26, 2005 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
In the last few months, I have been put on various drugs for sinus problems. These include antibiotics like Tequin and Levaquin as well as prednisone. The prednisone made me squirrelly, so I stopped it with my doctor's OK. I was given another course of Levaquin for a bladder infection and started feeling panicky. Then my doctor put me on Zoloft to combat anxiety. Next, I began having full-blown panic attacks and a bout of depression.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2005 | From Associated Press
Eli Lilly & Co. has changed the labeling on its antipsychotic Zyprexa to avoid confusion with Pfizer Inc.'s allergy medicine Zyrtec after some patients were given the wrong drug. Lilly said in a letter to psychiatrists and pharmacists that it had received 79 reports of such mix-ups since Zyprexa, which is used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, was introduced in 1996. The letter, dated Jan. 26, was posted Tuesday on the Food and Drug Administration's Medwatch website.
SCIENCE
June 18, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The Food and Drug Administration says it is investigating the unexplained deaths of two patients in the wake of receiving intramuscular injections of the antipsychotic medication Zyprexa (generic name olanzapine). The patients died three to four days after receiving appropriate doses of Zyprexa Relprevv, which is designed to release slowly into the blood over two to four weeks and provide regular dosing for adults with schizophrenia. The FDA says the deaths occurred well after the three-to-four-hour window following injection during which patients should be monitored in a physician's office for a potentially deadly complication called post-injection delirium sedation syndrome (PDSS)
BUSINESS
December 27, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Eli Lilly & Co. won a U.S. appeals court ruling upholding its patent on Zyprexa, the world's top-selling schizophrenia drug. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit on Tuesday affirmed a lower court decision that the patent was valid. The Ivax unit of Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. and Dr. Reddy's Laboratories Ltd. had claimed that a U.S. judge was mistaken in ruling that the drug was protected until Lilly's patent expires in 2011.
HEALTH
April 13, 2009 | Melissa Healy
About a year ago, patients began trooping into the office of UCLA psychiatrist Andrew Leuchter, asking whether an antipsychotic drug called Abilify "might be right for them." Few appeared to be delusional, plagued by hallucinations or suffering fearsome mood swings. Mostly, they were depressed or anxious, and frustrated by the pace of their recovery. Leuchter wondered what was up: Depressed patients didn't usually seek out drugs used to quell psychiatry's most disturbing symptoms.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2009 | Associated Press
Eli Lilly & Co. taught its sales force a catchy slogan to peddle the antipsychotic drug Zyprexa for treating the elderly. Company salespeople told care providers that 5 milligrams of Zyprexa at 5 p.m. -- or "5 at 5" -- would help dementia patients sleep. One problem: Regulators never approved selling the drug for dementia, and federal prosecutors say this type of marketing led to a record $1.42-billion settlement with Lilly announced Thursday.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
A widely used class of antipsychotic drugs that includes bestsellers Zyprexa, Risperdal and Seroquel is just as likely -- perhaps even more likely -- to cause a fatal heart attack as older antipsychotic drugs like haloperidol, researchers reported today. The findings, which run contrary to a long-standing belief, add to a growing drumbeat of criticism about this class of drugs, known as atypical antipsychotics.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Drug maker Eli Lilly & Co. cleared another legal cloud hanging over its top-selling drug, Zyprexa, when it announced a $62-million settlement Tuesday, but several other storms are still brewing for the antipsychotic medication. Lilly agreed to pay California, 31 other states and Washington to resolve an investigation into the company's marketing practices.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2008 | From Reuters
The state of Connecticut sued Eli Lilly & Co. on Tuesday, accusing the drug maker of illegally marketing and concealing serious side effects of its top-selling schizophrenia medicine, Zyprexa. Atty. Gen. Richard Blumenthal is seeking to recover "millions of taxpayer and consumer dollars improperly spent on Zyprexa as a result of its illegal marketing, and millions more spent for treatment of serious side effects from Zyprexa," according to a statement. Indianapolis-based Lilly is in a trial in Alaska that began this month in which the state has made similar claims involving the drug.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Eli Lilly & Co. said Wednesday that it received a subpoena in November from a U.S. grand jury in Pennsylvania seeking documents involving the marketing of the company's bestselling drug, the antipsychotic Zyprexa. The Indianapolis drug maker is cooperating in state and U.S. investigations into its marketing practices, according to a statement from spokeswoman Marni Lemons.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2009 | Associated Press
Eli Lilly & Co. taught its sales force a catchy slogan to peddle the antipsychotic drug Zyprexa for treating the elderly. Company salespeople told care providers that 5 milligrams of Zyprexa at 5 p.m. -- or "5 at 5" -- would help dementia patients sleep. One problem: Regulators never approved selling the drug for dementia, and federal prosecutors say this type of marketing led to a record $1.42-billion settlement with Lilly announced Thursday.
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